This is a place for personal insights into our work by Save the Redwoods League leaders. You can explore posts by category: It Takes a Forest℠ focuses on League project and program updates; Off the Beaten Path gets you into the redwood forest; Redwoods Futures illuminates the issues affecting our redwood forests; and The Eighth Wonders explores the art, education, and science of the redwood forests. Please join the conversation by posting your stories and comments.

Janell Banday admires the redwoods at Joaquin Miller Park. This park offers multiple redwood groves, many trails, and a distant view of the Bay Bridge.

Student Perspectives: Have You Taken Advantage of Nature Yet?

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According to The Outdoor Foundation, just under half (49.2 percent) of Americans participated in an outdoor recreational activity in 2013. If you have not visited a national, local or state park lately, you are missing out on a great way to engage in outdoor recreation. Visiting parks not only supports a healthier lifestyle, but also an opportunity to learn.

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Why Protect Redwoods Infographic

Think Big Today with this Redwoods Infographic

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Long before the environmental movement started, Save the Redwoods League began its work to protect redwood forests as part of the early conservation movement. But like most habitats around the world, the redwood forests continue to need our support. The coast redwoods and giant sequoias, the tallest and largest trees in the world, and the diverse plants and animals that inhabit their forests need all of us to be their voice.

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Reese Næsborg and Cameron Williams of UC Berkeley climbing an old-growth Douglas fir. Photo by Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

New York Times Spotlights New League Research

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Redwoods are in the news this week, reminding the world once again that Earth’s tallest trees are truly ecosystems in their own right. Teeming with life from quite literally their roots to their highest leaves, the magnificent coast redwoods are home to hundreds of other species.

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Student Perspectives: 4 Reasons to Visit Joaquin Miller Park

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Although this park may be small in comparison to others, it is not lacking in variety of activities and scenery. From mountain biking to attending an outdoor play, this park has opportunities for people of all ages to enjoy, all while being removed from the bustle of the surrounding cities. Go to Joaquin Miller Park to discover the magic of the redwoods. Just minutes away from San Francisco and East Bay towns, you can take advantage of this local park any day of the week.

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Jordan Bender is the Save the Redwoods League education program intern

Redwoods Education Reaches Across Language Barriers

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As I prepared to teach my first Redwoods and Climate Change lesson in the classroom, I was admittedly nervous. This class was composed entirely of English language learners. As the students shuffled into the classroom, took their seats and began reading the board, it was clear they were excited about the week’s lesson.

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Students in the Exploring Your Watershed program explore Crab Cove.

From the Redwoods to the Bay

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We all know that redwood forests are part of a larger ecosystem, the components of which can find themselves closely intertwined and interconnected. This system can often be referred to as a watershed, where all the land-borne water downward, starting at the tops of the hills and making its way to the ocean. Everything in a watershed is connected, from the redwood forests to the San Francisco Bay — and knowing your place within the watershed can be a powerful tool in protecting these natural areas.

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Members of the Women's Save the Redwoods League in 1919

A League of Their Own: The Women Who Started Saving the Redwoods

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On August 8, 1919, Save the Redwoods League founders Madison Grant and Stephen Mather spoke to a packed auditorium in the Northern California mill town of Eureka. They had driven up from San Francisco, where the League had just held its first Board meeting, and they called for local support of the League’s mission to protect the redwoods. To their great surprise, they received a wildly enthusiastic response. Why were hundreds of citizens of Humboldt County, the epicenter of redwood logging operations, so receptive to this message of conservation?

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Teresa Baker at the Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion in Outdoor Organizations convening in 2016.

Taking Action on Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion

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What I hoped to gain from the recent Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion in Outdoor Organizations convening was a sense of togetherness on a topic that very few outdoor organizations and foundations are addressing in action. It is a complicated topic to wrap one’s brain around in reaching an action plan, I get it, but what is at stake is a country that will be majority people of color in 20 years, and if people of color are not developing relationships with the land now, we certainly won’t care about saving the redwoods or protecting endangered species as we grow into a majority status.

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Westfall Ranch’s 77 acres include a stunning second-growth redwood forest.

Westfall Ranch: Enhancing the Ancient Headwaters Forest

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In the scenic redwoods country near Eureka, California, lies Headwaters Forest Reserve. You might remember Headwaters as the subject of a very contentious, very public, decade-long struggle in the 1990s to protect ancient redwoods from continued logging. When you walk among its massive, moss-draped giants, it’s easy to see why so many people fought so hard for their preservation.

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Licorice ferns in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

When Ferns Grow on Trees

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In the depths of winter, an amazing emergence of emerald green ferns appear on cliffs, rocks, and forest tree trucks throughout the coast redwood forest. These delicate beauties are Polypodium glycyrrhiza, commonly known as licorice fern. The species name, glycyrrhiza, means sweet root in Greek and is aptly named because the fern’s rhizome tastes faintly of licorice.

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Giant sequoias in the snow. Photo by divwerf, Flickr Creative Commons

Join Me for a Snowy Sequoia Adventure

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We here in California are all pretty relieved by the rain and snow we have received this winter. Our plants are starting to bounce back, we can go skiing again, and our shoes are actually getting muddy when we hike … Continued