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See our news releases and media coverage, press contact and resources.

Media Contact

Ashley Boarman, Landis Communications, Inc. | (415) 359-2312

Email: redwoods@landispr.com


Press Coverage


Lonely Planet: See California’s redwood forests for free and help protect them into the future (external link)
January 2018

Patch Milpitas: Free Admission To California Redwoods State Parks 2018 (external link)
January 2018

ABC 30 Fresno: California state parks offering free admission on some Saturdays (external link)
January 2018

NBC San Diego: Redwoods State Parks: Free Second Saturdays in 2018 (external link)
January 2018

YubaNet.com: Save the Redwoods League to Provide Free Day-Use Admission to Visitors at Redwood State Parks on the Second Saturday of Each Month in 2018 (external link)
January 2018

The Press Democrat: Redwoods League offers free passes to California’s redwood parks (external link)
January 2018

Eureka Times-Standard: Redwood State Parks offer ‘Second Saturdays’ park passes (external link)
January 2018

The Tribune (San Luis Obispo): Take a look at some of the redwoods state parks you can visit for free in 2018 (external link)
January 2018

NBC Bay Area: Redwoods State Parks: Free Second Saturdays in 2018 (external link)
January 2018

The Mercury News/East Bay Times: Free admission coming to 40 California redwood state parks, once a month, starting Saturday (external link)
January 2018

The Mercury News/East Bay Times: 2018 dates for free admission to redwood parks (external link)
January 2018

Fox 11 Los Angeles: Visit California’s redwood state parks for free (external link)
January 2018

Los Angeles Times: Let the events of 1918 shape your travels in 2018 (external link)
January 2018

KTVU-TV: Visit California’s redwood state parks for free (external link)
January 2018

Mendocino Voice: Save the Redwoods League turns 100, gives you free park tickets (external link)
January 2018

The Sacramento Bee: Here are your chances to visit California’s redwoods for free at state parks (external link)
January 2018

The Modest Bee: Here are your chances to visit California’s redwoods for free at state parks (external link)
January 2018

Red Tricycle: Free Second Saturdays at the CA Redwoods State Parks Throughout 2018 (external link)
January 2018

More Press Coverage

About the League and Redwoods

Established in 1918, Save the Redwoods League is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to protect and restore redwood forests and connect people to their peace and beauty so these wonders of the natural world will flourish. The League was instrumental in saving the ancient redwood forest from extinction; negotiating the purchase of hundreds of thousands of acres of redwood forest, and helping to create redwood parks that inspire millions of annual visitors from around the world. The League’s science research has established that old growth redwoods store more carbon per acre than any other ecosystem in the world and play a critical role in the fight against climate change.

Date of League’s Founding: 1918

Headquarters: San Francisco, California (First office was located at University of California, Berkeley)

Current Membership: 19,000

Redwood Lands Preserved by the League: More than 200,000 acres to date

Number of Redwood Parks Established with Our Help: 66

Number of People Touched by Our Work: More than 30 million people visit a redwood park annually


Redwoods FAQs:
Where are redwoods located?
What species do redwoods belong to?
What are the current threats to redwood and giant sequoia forests?
How do we protect redwood forests today?
What are the League's priorities for its second century?
What are the benefits of redwood forest restoration?

Coast Redwood Quick Facts

  • Number of Acres of Remaining Old-Growth Coast Redwood Forest: 120,000 acres, or about 5 percent of the original forest (the size of San Jose)
  • Total protected coast redwood forest: 23% of their range, 382,000 acres
  • Privately owned coast redwood forest: 77% of their range, 1,256,000 acres
  • Fun Fact: Ancient coast redwood forests store more carbon than any other type of forest on the planet

Giant Sequoia Quick Facts

  • Total Acreage of Remaining Ancient Giant Sequoias: About 43,000 acres, or about 65 percent of the original forest
  • Protected giant sequoia forest: 48,000 acres
  • Privately owned coast redwood forest: 3,000 acres
  • Fun Fact: The widest tree is 31.4 feet, the length of two Toyota Prius cars
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