Blog

This is a place for personal insights into our work by Save the Redwoods League leaders. You can explore posts by category: It Takes a Forest SM focuses on League project and program updates; Off the Beaten Path gets you into the redwood forest; Redwoods Futures illuminates the issues affecting our redwood forests; and The Eighth Wonders explores the art, education, and science of the redwood forests. Please join the conversation by posting your stories and comments.

Infographic describes the benefits that redwoods provide for people and wildlife.

Infographic Shows How Redwoods Help People and Wildlife

on

Did you know that the California Legislature named the coast redwood as California’s official state tree on April 3, 1937? In honor of our magnificent redwoods, we’ve created an infographic to show just some of the ways that redwoods support people and wildlife.


Redwoods Education Reaches Across Language Barriers

on

As I prepared to teach my first Redwoods and Climate Change lesson in the classroom, I was admittedly nervous. This class was composed entirely of English language learners. As the students shuffled into the classroom, took their seats and began reading the board, it was clear they were excited about the week’s lesson.



From the Redwoods to the Bay

on

We all know that redwood forests are part of a larger ecosystem, the components of which can find themselves closely intertwined and interconnected. This system can often be referred to as a watershed, where all the land-borne water downward, starting at the tops of the hills and making its way to the ocean. Everything in a watershed is connected, from the redwood forests to the San Francisco Bay — and knowing your place within the watershed can be a powerful tool in protecting these natural areas.


A League of Their Own: The Women Who Started Saving the Redwoods

on

On August 8, 1919, Save the Redwoods League founders Madison Grant and Stephen Mather spoke to a packed auditorium in the Northern California mill town of Eureka. They had driven up from San Francisco, where the League had just held its first Board meeting, and they called for local support of the League’s mission to protect the redwoods. To their great surprise, they received a wildly enthusiastic response. Why were hundreds of citizens of Humboldt County, the epicenter of redwood logging operations, so receptive to this message of conservation?


Wendy Millett

Wendy Millet: Her Conservation Roots Run Deep

on

As a literature major at Harvard, Wendy Millet’s love of the natural world was deepened by reading Emerson, Muir and Thoreau. But Millet liked getting her hands dirty too, so during and after college, she worked on ranches in Montana and Wyoming.


A comparison of a coast redwood’s height next to a 37-story building.

Graphic Takes Understanding to New Heights

on

Many of you probably have heard of Arbor Day, the holiday when people plant and care for trees. In the United States, National Arbor Day is always celebrated on the last Friday in April. But did you know that many …


Knitted ruffle lichen by Celeste Woo.

Amazing Knitted Canopy Creatures Coming to Muir Woods

on

Although you will not see a great abundance of lichen on the trunks of redwood trees, high up in the canopy the branches are covered with a rich variety of lichen species, adding to the complex habitat the redwoods are …


Student Perspectives: Give Your Future Kids a Place in Nature

on

I haven’t swum along the Great Barrier Reef or trekked through the Amazon Rainforest. I haven’t looked up towards the Aurora Borealis or looked down at the enormity of Victoria Falls. What I have seen, and what I’m lucky to have seen, are redwood forests stretching far and reaching tall.


Teresa Baker at the Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion in Outdoor Organizations convening in 2016.

Taking Action on Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion

on

What I hoped to gain from the recent Cultural Relevancy and Inclusion in Outdoor Organizations convening was a sense of togetherness on a topic that very few outdoor organizations and foundations are addressing in action. It is a complicated topic to wrap one’s brain around in reaching an action plan, I get it, but what is at stake is a country that will be majority people of color in 20 years, and if people of color are not developing relationships with the land now, we certainly won’t care about saving the redwoods or protecting endangered species as we grow into a majority status.


Joseph Haas: Boy Scout Orchestrates Amazing Park Project

on

Not many high school sophomores can say they’ve orchestrated major infrastructure improvements on public land — but Joseph Haas can. At age 14, Joseph (now 15) spearheaded the installation of four sturdy new bridges at Sinkyone Wilderness State Park. Joseph …


Westfall Ranch’s 77 acres include a stunning second-growth redwood forest.

Westfall Ranch: Enhancing the Ancient Headwaters Forest

on

In the scenic redwoods country near Eureka, California, lies Headwaters Forest Reserve. You might remember Headwaters as the subject of a very contentious, very public, decade-long struggle in the 1990s to protect ancient redwoods from continued logging. When you walk among its massive, moss-draped giants, it’s easy to see why so many people fought so hard for their preservation.


Licorice ferns in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

When Ferns Grow on Trees

on

In the depths of winter, an amazing emergence of emerald green ferns appear on cliffs, rocks, and forest tree trucks throughout the coast redwood forest. These delicate beauties are Polypodium glycyrrhiza, commonly known as licorice fern. The species name, glycyrrhiza, means sweet root in Greek and is aptly named because the fern’s rhizome tastes faintly of licorice.


Giant sequoias in the snow. Photo by divwerf, Flickr Creative Commons

Join Me for a Snowy Sequoia Adventure

on

We here in California are all pretty relieved by the rain and snow we have received this winter. Our plants are starting to bounce back, we can go skiing again, and our shoes are actually getting muddy when we hike …


Transamerica Redwood Park in San Francisco. Photo by TheWestEnd, Flickr Creative Commons

Super Bowl and Redwoods – What Could They Possibly Have in Common?

on

NOTHING! Well, almost nothing… Really, the only thing they share in common is bringing people together outdoors. Although it’s a far cry from a park or beach, at the very least, the Super Bowl will be played outside among a …


Jared Huffman

Jared Huffman: A Redwoods Champion in Congress

on

As both a California Assemblyman and now U.S. Representative, Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) earned a reputation as a stalwart champion of the environment, including the redwood forest.


Sean Halter explores Mt. Tamalpais.

Student Perspectives: The Mystery of Mount Tam

on

I always wondered what made Mount Tam so special. It always seemed mysterious to me since I had no idea what to expect. Once I got up there, I found out for myself that Mount Tam is more than just a place in Marin, it’s my home in the redwoods.


Wood rose or dwarf rose, is known botanically as Rosa gymnocarpa. Photo by hit_the_snow, Flickr Creative Commons

Coast Redwood Forest’s Native Rose

on

Did you know that the coast redwood forest is home to a native rose? The wood rose or dwarf rose, is known botanically as Rosa gymnocarpa. It grows throughout Western North America and commonly grows on the forest floor of …


John Laird

John Laird: Forest Protection a Top Priority for California Leader

on

John Laird, California Secretary for Natural Resources, recalls when redwoods first became significant in his life. He grew up as the son of teachers in Vallejo, and his family would often visit his maternal grandparents in the North Bay.


Bird's nest fungus. Photo by pellaea, Flickr Creative Commons.

Fall Rains Bring Forest Mushrooms

on

With all these wonderful rainy days the forests are probably bursting at the seams with mushrooms. Some mushrooms, like the bright scarlet waxy cap or the colorful coral fungus, immediately draw your attention as they poke up out of the …