Blog

This is a place for personal insights into our work by Save the Redwoods League leaders. You can explore posts by category: It Takes a Forest SM focuses on League project and program updates; Off the Beaten Path gets you into the redwood forest; Redwoods Futures illuminates the issues affecting our redwood forests; and The Eighth Wonders explores the art, education, and science of the redwood forests. Please join the conversation by posting your stories and comments.

Save the Redwoods League introduces a new free travel guide for parents and kids

Editor’s Notes: The Family Guide to the Giant Sequoias

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For almost a year now we’ve worked on developing and producing the first-ever family guide to the redwoods. Initially we were going to produce a single edition, but after the writing and editing were underway, we soon realized that we Continued


What Do These Commonly-Used Words Really Mean?

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Today is World Dictionary Day, and in honor of that I’d like to discuss a few words that are used a lot in our conservation science work.  They are: Precision, Accuracy, and Bias.  These may seem familiar, but they have Continued


The Coastal Trail, Last Chance section, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park. Photo by David Baselt

Do You Want to Move State Parks Forward?

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Save the Redwoods League does. In this fast-changing world, we either move forward or we are left behind. California’s state parks house some of the world’s most treasured natural resources, including large portions of our beloved redwood forest.  We visit Continued


Are You a Scientist?

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If you search on Google images for “scientist,” you get a lot of photos of men and women with unkempthair, white lab coats and goggles. If you ask a child what they think a scientist looks like, they will give Continued


How Tall is Your Tree?

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Ever wondered how big that tree in your backyard is?  There are many ways to measure the heights of trees, but most of them unfortunately require lots of time, money, and specialized equipment.  There is one method, however, that needs Continued


Bats of Humboldt Redwoods

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Last week, we drove into Humboldt Redwoods State Park at dusk to watch bats dart over Bull Creek. We joined up with USDA Forest Service researcher, Ted Weller, and his team as they studied local and migrating bats through the Continued



Could You Survive in a Redwood Forest?

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As I’ve become more familiar with Bay Area plants over the years, it is difficult for me to go hiking and not think to myself, “Yum, blackberry—oh look, bay laurel—I didn’t know horsetail grew around here.” If you go hiking with Continued


Government Shutdown? Get Outside Anyway!

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Has the government shutdown stymied your grand plans to visit a national park? While our beloved national parks and monuments are closed indefinitely, lots of other beautiful state parks and reserves are still open! Take this opportunity to explore a Continued


On the edge: Eastern redwoods

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I recently drove eastward through the many vineyards of the Napa Valley in search of coast redwoods living on the species’ eastern boundary. Given how widespread redwoods used to be on planet Earth, the edges of the natural redwood range today Continued


Big Win in Court for a Small Endangered Bird

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Marbled murrelets haven’t had an easy century.  With their oceanic feeding grounds impacted by commercial fishing and the occasional oil spill, and their ancient forest nesting grounds mostly lost to the axe and the saw, these shy creatures have had Continued


Shady Dell’s Smallest Wonder

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The Lost Coast is a destination for intrepid hikers who enjoy the rough and uninterrupted coastline of Mendocino County. If you’re one of them, I recommend you take some time looking underfoot next time you explore the wilderness to see Continued


Time to Get Our Kids Back Into the Forest!

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For many people, September symbolizes the start of school: time to pack away the camping gear and get out the pencils, paper and backpacks. Vacations in the redwoods come to a close and are replaced by the routine of shuttling Continued


Barred Owls – Should They Stay or Should They Go?

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The recent winner of our photo contest photographed a barred owl sitting on the branch of a redwood tree – an image difficult to capture as owls are more often heard than seen. But this image raises the question of Continued


A Redwood of a Blog: How the Giant Trees Grow

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RCCI’s nursery experiments and tree ring analyses are essential to understanding the past and future of the redwood forest, but it is the trees themselves that tell us about its present. By establishing 16 large plots in old-growth forests throughout Continued


The First Redwoods

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The redwood lineage has lived on Earth for many millions of years. The first recognizable Sequoia left its imprint in the fossil record 200 millions ago, during the Jurassic when dinosaurs roamed the land and filled the sea. If we journeyed back Continued


Dendrochronology: The Glue that Binds RCCI

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The first phase of the Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative was based upon understanding how past climate has affected the ancient redwood and giant sequoia forests.  To do this, the research teams relied upon the science of dendrochronology: the analysis of Continued


RCCI researchers Chris Wong and Wendy Baxter monitor the seedlings. Photo by Anthony Ambrose.

The Seedling-Drought Experiment and Its Surprising Result

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Last week, I spent some time wondering broadly about our recent RCCI results, and just whether we could say for certain that 1) climate change is spurring an increase in redwood growth, and 2) if that change is “good” for Continued


Nature Photography: Pretty Pictures or So Much More?

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Photography can be a powerful tool for change. It can inspire and inform us and broaden our horizons. A photo can tell a story or impart an emotion in ways words simply cannot. Ansel Adams elevated the art form of Continued


Redwood Trees Inspire Innovation in the Desert

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During my years teaching and taking students out into nature, the question that always crossed my mind was, “What can we learn from this forest ecosystem?” Some of us learn to identify plants, trees and birds. Others learn the art Continued