Blog

This is a place for personal insights into our work by Save the Redwoods League leaders. You can explore posts by category: It Takes a Forest SM focuses on League project and program updates; Off the Beaten Path gets you into the redwood forest; Redwoods Futures illuminates the issues affecting our redwood forests; and The Eighth Wonders explores the art, education, and science of the redwood forests. Please join the conversation by posting your stories and comments.

Working hard, assessing areas where old, fallen trees need to be removed. Not a bad day "at the office"!

What Happens to the Land Once We’ve Bought It? Stewardship Happens!

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We all get really excited when we close a big project—like when we acquired the beautiful 145-acre property with pristine redwoods next to Portola Redwoods State Park a few months ago, or when we received a conservation easement on 90 …


Giant sequoia cones. Photo by Mark Bult

Finding Patterns in the Redwoods: It’s Easy as 1, 1, 2, 3…

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Nature’s patterns are everywhere.  Sometimes they’re obvious – we mammals, for instance, almost always have five fingers and five toes on each hand and foot.  Sometimes these patterns aren’t nearly so apparent, but they’re still there nonetheless. The Fibonacci sequence …


Portola Redwoods State Park.

Hope for Our State Park System

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Crisis is turning into opportunity for our state park system. California State Parks has new, effective leadership in Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (retired). And the State’s Little Hoover Commission just issued its thoughtful report, identifying many of the …


Trillium is toxic!

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Have you ever seen this stunning flower in the redwood forest? It is a Giant Wake Robin, or Trillium chloropetalum, and was recently seen blooming in the Santa Cruz Mountains


Kellogg and his Travel Log. Photo credit: Humboldt Redwoods Interpretive Association

The First RV was a…Redwood?

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Humboldt Redwoods State Park is home to the world’s first RV, Charles Kellogg’s Travel Log, handmade in 1917 from a fallen chunk of a redwood log and mounted on a 1917 Nash Quad truck, the toughest, most rugged vehicle of its kind at the time.



Howland Hills Road, Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park.

Economic Benefit of Conservation

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All you readers out there know that a day in the redwoods is good for the soul.  It is calming, inspirational, healing and fun. Whether you walk with your honey, picnic with friends or romp with your children, it is …


Sequoias Suddenly Snowless

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I fastened on my snowshoes and set off for a wintertime hike among the giant sequoias.  I quickly realized the snow in the forest was patchy at best and completely melted at worst, and it’s only March! It was shocking …


Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. Photo by Jon Parmentier

Three Northern Forests Paint a Picture of Hope

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I don’t get out to the woods for work nearly enough these days (then again, who does?), but last week was an exception.  During a trip to the Northern California forests for some meetings, I was lucky enough to get …


Bay Lights – 1.5 Redwoods Tall

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  Outside our office this week the San Francisco Bay Bridge began twinkling with the artistic illumination of 25,000 new LED lights strung along the west span.  After dusk, views of the bridge are spectacular as waves of light pulse along 1.8 …


Founders Grove, Humboldt Redwoods State Park

Tradition. History. Healing.

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Images, encounters, and lessons in Humboldt Redwoods State Park on a grey, dry winter Saturday – March 2, 2013: Bolling Grove, the League’s first memorial grove of redwoods.  Stop #2 on the Avenue of the Giants auto tour.  Paid respects …



Giant in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

Redwoods and the Passage of Time

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Time.  Einstein said, “Time is an illusion.” We all feel that it goes by too fast. Dr. Seuss said, “How did it get so late so soon?” To make a difference, we have to focus on now.  As Mother Teresa said, …


Burned tree in Redwood National Park.

Where do forests come from?

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Whenever I’m out in the forest, I can’t help but think about how it all got started.  Even though the redwoods may seem timeless and unchanging, they almost always began in turmoil.  These periods of rapid change are known as …


Montgomery Woods State Park. Photo by Peter Buranzon

Redwoods and the Economy

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Why does the League work tirelessly to save the redwoods? “They are beautiful, peaceful, humbling, inspiring…” according to a recent visitor. Yet there is another important, practical reason: it benefits the economy. Our public lands contribute to the nation’s economic …


Another Side of Cemex

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This week I explored Cemex Redwoods in the Santa Cruz Mountains with my colleagues.  I’d been there many times, but this time felt different because I walked into corners of the expansive property that I hadn’t seen before. During my …


The League will own, steward and manage Shady Dell for the foreseeable future until we can transfer it to a permanent steward.

The Tasks Ahead

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“To some it might appear that, having accomplished what will be considered one of the greatest pieces of conservation work in America, the Redwoods League might not have a place of as great importance in the future as that occupied …


Spring is coming!

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Punxsutawney Phil predicts spring will come early this year. As much fun as it is to trust the behavior of a charismatic groundhog, I also love searching for my own signs of spring a little closer to home. Wildflowers are …


You helped us protect the Noyo River Redwoods. Photo by Julie Martin

The Fight to Save the Redwoods: Then and Now

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Since 1918, Save the Redwoods League has been fighting to fund redwoods protection all the while the funding for land conservation in California has continued to change. More recently, between 2002 and 2006, the voters of California approved bond measures to …


Redwood burl. Photo by Peter Montesano

Exploring the Mysteries of Redwood Burls

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We’ve all seen them—those enormous growths from the trunks or bases of redwood trees, sometimes covered in new sprouts, sometimes appearing to drip down the side of the tree like the molten remnants of a lost limb.  These strange formations …