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Redwood forest covers the rolling landscape of Mailliard Ranch. Protecting the ranch will safeguard these precious forests, abundant plant and animal habitat, as well as clean air and water. Photo by John Birchard.
Redwood forest covers the rolling landscape of Mailliard Ranch. Protecting the ranch will safeguard these precious forests, abundant plant and animal habitat, as well as clean air and water. Photo by John Birchard.
Thanks to our generous donors, California voters and the State of California Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB), Save the Redwoods League is set to complete the first phase of our Mailliard Ranch project, which protects three-quarters of this majestic property from development and subdivision. Protection of the ranch will secure the stability of the regional forest ecosystem.

Inspired by the challenge offered by Justin Faggioli and Sandra Donnell, Save the Redwoods League Board Chair and Councilor respectively, to match all new gifts up to $250,000, League donors closed the $500,000 gap by the May 25 deadline.

On the same day, the WCB granted the League $4.75 million toward the purchase of conservation easements for three-quarters of the ranch – the West and Middle portions. We thank the WCB for sharing our vision of conserving these portions totaling 11,178 acres rich in young redwood forests, wildlife and streams. The WCB’s grant stemmed from Proposition 84 (external link), the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006, which was approved by California voters in the 2006 general election. We thank California voters for their investment in our natural resources.

In addition, the California Natural Resources Agency’s Environmental Enhancement and Mitigation Program awarded $500,000 for the West portion. The program was established by legislation in 1989 under the California Streets and Highways Code with funding from the Highway Users Tax Account.

The League is seeking public funding to complete the final phase in Mailliard Ranch’s protection over the next two years.

Meeting these goals today shows how public and private funding is the key to our work in protecting, restoring and connecting people to the redwood forest, our American treasure.

Learn more about majestic Mailliard Ranch.


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