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citizen science projects

Students from Half Moon Bay High School collect plant data as part of our Redwoods and Climate Change High School Program.

Tracking Seasonal Changes in Our Parks

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What determines when shrubs bloom? The study of seasonal life cycle events such as this is called phenology, and gathering long-term data on these cycles is the focus of the California Phenology Project (CPP). Collecting data is simple, and anyone can participate. For the past couple of months, I’ve been tracking some plants in Redwood Regional Park as part of the Redwood Phenology Project by Save the Redwoods League and the East Bay Regional Park District.

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Pacific Trillium

Calling all Redwood Volunteers

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As a science-based conservation organization we are always looking at the latest redwood research to help guide our efforts to protect, restore, and connect people to these magnificent forests. Our citizen science projects are one way we engage the general public in our work to get a better picture of what is happening in the redwoods.

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Fern Watch volunteers at Purisima Creek Redwoods Preserve.

Watching Ferns in the Redwoods for Signs of Climate Change

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The sword fern, one of the most common redwood forest plants, has become prominent in my life over the past few years. This is mostly due to the League’s Fern Watch project, which monitors the health of sword ferns throughout the redwood range. Even though these ferns are common, little is known about their ecology and how they respond to climatic change.

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Are You a Scientist?

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If you search on Google images for “scientist,” you get a lot of photos of men and women with unkempthair, white lab coats and goggles. If you ask a child what they think a scientist looks like, they will give … Continued

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