coast redwoods

: LWCF helped make it possible for Save the Redwoods League to protect part of the Prairie Creek corridor and add the land to Redwood National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Photo by Max Forster

Celebrating the NPS Centennial in the Redwoods

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Over the weekend, the League celebrated the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service at our Orick Mill Site property near Redwood National and State Parks. It was a momentous event, and I was honored to speak to the attendees about the significance of the moment. For those who weren’t able to be there, I’ll take the opportunity to share my remarks, and some photos, here.

Shady Dell trail

Shady Dell

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For more than 100 years, this forest was a private, hidden treasure. Your generous gifts enabled Save the Redwoods League to buy the 957-acre Shady Dell and plan its restoration.

The study found that although trees within 5 meters of each other (like these here) were more likely to be clones than trees farther away, they weren’t always. Photo by Jason Hollinger, Flickr Creative Commons

Some Coast Redwoods May Seem to Be Clones, but They’re Not

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If you’ve visited a coast redwood forest, you’ve probably seen these trees growing around the stump of a logged giant. These “fairy rings,” as they’re known informally, show how the coast redwood reproduces asexually by sending new sprouts up from the trunk base of a parent redwood. The mystery was whether these sprouts are genetically identical copies of the parent redwood. Because 95 percent of the current coast redwood range is younger forests, understanding the genetics of the coast redwood is critical for conservation and restoration. Learn more about this research.

A comparison of a coast redwood’s height next to a 37-story building.

Graphic Takes Understanding to New Heights

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Many of you probably have heard of Arbor Day, the holiday when people plant and care for trees. In the United States, National Arbor Day is always celebrated on the last Friday in April. But did you know that many …

Justin Faggioli is Save the Redwoods League Board of Directors Secretary.

Justin Faggioli: Developing Strategies for a Leafy Future

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After college earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth sciences at Stanford University, Justin Faggioli spent three years working as a geologist, primarily on projects in Alaska. His job took him to some of the most remote areas of the state, most of the time in a helicopter. In addition to the geologic work, Justin was able to enjoy the beautiful flora, amazing fauna and spectacular scenery.

John Montague and his daughter.

John Montague: Finder of the Tallest Trees and a Dedicated Supporter

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When redwoods enthusiast John Montague first volunteered at Save the Redwoods League, he began by assisting with chores at the office. He’s so dedicated to the forest that soon after he volunteered out in the field, mapping, taking measurements, and identifying notable trees under the League’s direction.

Allyson Carroll: Decoding History Hidden in Redwoods

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Dendrochronologist Allyson Carroll has decoded centuries of history hidden in giant sequoias and coast redwoods, thanks to the League’s research grants program and our members’ support.

Peter Comanor, right.

Peter Comanor: An Investment to Protect ‘A Beautiful Earth’

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For botanist and plant ecologist Peter Comanor, the redwood forest is about receiving and giving. He first saw a redwood tree in an exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. It was, he recalled, an interesting and informative display, but it didn’t prepare him for his first visit to the redwood forest.

What We’re Learning from the Redwoods

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When we take a close look at what makes redwoods survive and thrive, the trees have remarkable stories to tell. That’s what researchers discovered thanks to three studies supported by research grants from Save the Redwoods League over the past …

You’re Invited! Hendy Woods Celebration

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For decades, Hendy Woods State Park has been a favorite destination among locals and visitors for camping, hiking and swimming among gigantic 1,000-year-old redwoods. With trails winding through not one but two ancient redwood groves and the Navarro River flowing by, …

Top 3 Bay Area Redwood Parks You’ve Never Heard Of

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It’s almost summertime, which means it’s time to get outside and see the redwoods! One of the best things about living in the Bay Area is easy access to redwood forests. But Muir Woods and other renowned protected spaces are …

Your gifts are helping to decommission former logging roads and plant redwoods in Headwaters Forest Reserve. One day, the restored areas will resemble ancient redwood groves like this one at the reserve. Photo by Humboldt State University

Heal Headwaters Forest Reserve

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Your generous donations are restoring habitat for wildlife and speeding development of tomorrow’s beautiful old-growth groves at Headwaters Forest, the reserve established in 1999 after a long and contentious dispute over the logging of its ancient coast redwood forest.

Kathy Bailey co-founded Hendy Woods Community, the group that helped keep the Hendy Woods State Park open when it faced closure because of a state budget crisis. Photo by Joan Hamilton

Kathy Bailey Champions Hendy Woods

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When Hendy Woods State Park faced closure in 2011 because of California State Parks budget cuts, Kathy Bailey said she knew she had to get involved. So she co-founded Hendy Woods Community, which, with Save the Redwoods League, helped keep the park open for all to enjoy.

Warming Redwood Weather

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Wendy Baxter and Anthony Ambrose from Todd Dawson’s Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley have been tracking weather in the League’s Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative research plots in the coast redwood and giant sequoias forests. Check out their latest weather report …

Sniffing for Science

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Scientists certainly come in all shapes and sizes, but did you know sometimes they have four paws?! Recently, the League partnered with Tim Beam (Humboldt State University), Scott Osborn (California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife), and Working Dogs for Conservation …

Turkeys in the Redwoods

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As we sit back and relax on the day after Thanksgiving, our bellies still full from our decadent meals the day before, I’m thinking about turkeys, redwoods, and what the Native Americans might have eaten years before us at this …

Rain creates colorful mushroom show

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Aren’t we all more than a little relieved for the recent coast rains after too many dry, drought-stricken months here in California? I always look for mushrooms on the forest floor as proof that the rain has really sunk in. Last week …

Wild strawberry plant.

Protecting Plantings

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Recently, I visited Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park and was surprised to see mesh bags dotting the forest floor. Taking a closer look, I saw a variety of plants hidden under the mesh coverings. Park ecologist Jeff Frey explain the park …

Green Cones Go Red

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Typically, cones mature on the redwood branches in autumn. They turn slightly yellow as the cone scales separate, exposing the seeds hidden within to the elements. Rain then washes away tannic crystals that hold the seeds inside the cones and …