Save the Redwoods League revenue comes from individuals, foundations, corporations, government agencies and investments.

As is common in land conservation, the transaction cycle of Save the Redwoods League often requires several years for completion. While land and forests are protected from the time of purchase, the League often remains a steward of those lands until they can be transferred to a public agency or nonprofit land trust for ongoing stewardship, public access and permanent protection. The program expense is recognized when a property is transferred to its permanent steward, or when a conservation easement is acquired. Since land divestments and conservation easement acquisitions are episodic and markedly affect the League’s expense ratio from year to year, we believe a five-year rolling average is a more meaningful depiction.
As is common in land conservation, the transaction cycle of Save the Redwoods League often requires several years for completion. While land and forests are protected from the time of purchase, the League often remains a steward of those lands until they can be transferred to a public agency or nonprofit land trust for ongoing stewardship, public access and permanent protection. The program expense is recognized when a property is transferred to its permanent steward, or when a conservation easement is acquired. Since land divestments and conservation easement acquisitions are episodic and markedly affect the League’s expense ratio from year to year, we believe a five-year rolling average is a more meaningful depiction.

Review our annual audited financial statements and IRS 990 forms below.
Save the Redwoods League is exempt from federal income taxation under Section 501(C)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Our revenue comes from individuals, foundations, corporations, government agencies and investments. With these generous donations, since 1918, the League has protected and restored redwood forests and connected people with their peace and beauty so these wonders of the natural world flourish.

Unfortunately, some ancient redwoods remain unprotected, and forests that are protected face threats from a changing environment, disease and devastating government budget cuts. Your donations help us save these special places, allowing us to purchase redwood land, restore logged forests, study how to best protect them and teach children and adults about these magical expressions of life. See the difference your support has made.


Annual Audited Financial Statements


IRS Form 990

Save the Redwoods League is exempt from federal income taxation under Section 501(C)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

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Impact of Your Donations

See the difference your support has made.

2014–2015

Because of our members’ generous gifts, Save the Redwoods League made great progress in our mission to protect and restore the redwood forest and connect people to it throughout the redwoods’ ranges. We completed conservation transactions and campaigns for redwood lands covering more than 9,100 acres and helped to restore degraded areas in ancient redwood forests. We also moved forward on work to restore beloved trails and create amenities in parks to enrich visitors’ experiences. Nearly all these projects incorporate or will involve the three elements of our work:

  • PROTECT ancient redwoods and the vibrant forest landscapes that sustain them
  • RESTORE younger redwood forests so they become the old-growth forests for future generations
  • CONNECT people to the peace and beauty of the California redwoods through a network of world-class parks and protected areas

PROTECT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Berry Glen Trail Connection: Purchased this 4.7-acre property surrounded by legendary Redwood National and State Parks. Berry Glen protects the intersection of popular hiking trails and prime habitat for elk and imperiled coho salmon.
  • Big River-Mendocino Old-Growth Redwoods: Purchased 83-acre wonderland surrounded by Mendocino Headlands State Park. This land embraces a rare pygmy forest and an amazing ancient redwood forest.
  • Loma Mar Redwoods: Helped purchase and transfer to San Mateo County Department of Parks this magical 174-acre forest of big redwoods that’s now open to the public as part of Memorial Park.
  • Peters Creek and Boulder Creek Old-Growth Forests, Van Kempen Forest: Completed campaign to purchase 145-acre Peters Creek and the 33-acre Van Kempen forest and acquired a conservation easement for 214-acre Boulder Creek, protecting ancient wonders within easy reach of millions in the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • San Vicente Redwoods: Acquired conservation easement that permanently protects from development 8,500 acres of redwood forestlands, waterways and imperiled wildlife. Collaborated to complete plan for managing and restoring this landscape to support old-growth stands, wildlife habitat, sustainable timber harvesting and public recreation.

RESTORE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Orick Mill Site: Advanced work to return former site of old-growth redwood lumber mill to nature and create a visitor center at this southern gateway of world-famous Redwood National and State Parks.
  • Headwaters Forest Reserve: Funded decommissioning of former logging roads, redwood planting and removal of invasive plants. Half of this magnificent ancient forest had been harvested before a protracted logging dispute made national news and led to the reserve’s establishment in 1999.
  • Cape Vizcaino: With help of 80 goats, removed invasive plants on this remote League-owned property that protects majestic redwoods, diverse wildlife and spectacular vistas of the Lost Coast.

CONNECT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Humboldt Redwoods State Park: Enabled reconstruction of 2.5 miles of the 6-mile River Trail that runs through the ancient Garden Club of America Grove.
  • Shady Dell: With support from the California State Coastal Conservancy, California Coastal Commission, Mendocino Land Trust and California State Parks, began construction of a 2.3-mile extension of the Lost Coast Trail in the home of the magical candelabra-shaped redwoods. Construction is to be complete by fall 2016.
  • Hendy Woods State Park: Started upgrading the day-use area with new picnic shelters, interpretive signage, bathrooms, walkways, a repaved parking lot and a regraded trail — all accessible to people with disabilities. Improvements were open in summer 2015 to the park’s 50,000 annual visitors.
  • Berkeley and Oakland, California: Provided 150 high school students with experiences in the redwoods where they learned about the impact of climate change firsthand.
  • Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park: Secured permits to rebuild the popular fire-damaged Pfeiffer Falls Trail and add interpretive signage. The new trail is scheduled to be complete by spring 2017.
  • Throughout California: Through our Education Grants Program, 6,200 youths learned why redwood forests matter and what needs to be done to protect them.