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Watch: The Future of Redwoods Conservation and Why You Should Care

Save the Redwoods League and our members have been in the business of protecting and restoring redwood forests, as well as studying the mysteries of the forest and connecting people with these natural wonders, for nearly 100 years.
When we began this work in 1918, the world was a very different place. Today, the redwood forest is faced with a new — and much more complex — set of challenges. These challenges present exciting opportunities to strategize and innovate to ensure the best outcome for the redwoods in our next hundred years.

If you’re interested in learning more about what the future of redwoods conservation holds, check out this talk I gave at the Commonwealth Club:

Edward O. Wilson, a biologist so knowledgeable and compelling that his previous works have become required reading in university conservation classes, recently published a new book called Half Earth. In it, he names California’s redwood forests first on his personal list of “best places,” the areas that contain the most superlative biodiversity and are most in need of research and protection. Wilson explains that, essentially, these are the places he cares the most about.

Those of us who have visited, learned about, or seen images of a redwood forest will understand the feeling of caring deeply about what happens to this ancient, unique, inspiring corner of the Earth. Listen to my talk to find out what threatens the redwoods today, how we can ensure that this irreplaceable forest will thrive into the future — and why you should care.

Then, let me know what you think in the comments section! You can also connect with me on Twitter @SamH4Redwoods and follow me for tweets about trees, trails and other truths.


About Sam Hodder

Chief Enthusiast for the Outdoors (CEO) and Prez of Save the Redwoods League, Sam brings more than 20 years of experience in overseeing land conservation programs from the remote wilderness to the inner city.



The redwood forest inspires the students in our Redwoods and Climate Change High School Program.

Redwood Haikus

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It is well known that the redwoods inspire people in many different ways. Some want to study how the trees and forest function; others hike beneath the branches for exercise, and still others paint and photograph these majestic beauties.


Kyle Da Silva, League Redwoods Reporter. Photo by Ella Teevan

The Understory

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In the tangle of our wireless world we are more connected than ever before. It’s puzzling, then, how distant we now find ourselves from the natural environment. While our world migrates into the cloud, the Redwoods Reporter series will keep a pair of boots on the trail with educators, adventurers, foresters, chefs, doctors, artists and scientists who are called back by the redwood forests.


3 Responses to “Watch: The Future of Redwoods Conservation and Why You Should Care”

  1. Barbara Kilpatrick

    Thank you for the refreshing and enlightening
    talk. One more chance to learn and appreciate the Redwood and to hope future generations value the same and invest to preserve the Redwoods.

    Reply
  2. Linda Fair

    I heard the news about possibly closing down the National parks in Humbolt county (Richardson grove Park) in order to cut down redwoods to use in a housing project. I can’t even begin to tell tou how upset this makes me. My childhood memories are based around my families’ yearly visit to the redwoods and I plan on doing the same for my children. Please email me with anything I can do to stop this from happening. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Save the Redwoods League

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks so much for your comment and concern for the redwoods! We are unaware of the project you mentioned but work daily on many other important conservation projects. Please sign up for our email list to stay informed of the most current and pressing projects that need your help! http://www.SaveTheRedwoods.org/signup

      Reply

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