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Protect

San Vicente Redwoods. Photo by William K. Matthias
We protect redwoods by purchasing redwood forests and the surrounding lands needed to nurture them. Another way we protect forests is by acquiring conservation easements or agreements, which grant the League the legal right to safeguard the forest from harmful land use practices forever.

Protection Forever

Our science-based Vibrant Forest Plan guides our efforts to protect and restore redwood forests. This plan identifies where we need to protect land to strengthen the forests we have conserved since our founding in 1918.

The Vibrant Forest Plan incorporates the theory and principles of conservation biology. These principles guide Save the Redwoods to protect large blocks of contiguous redwood land that embrace the diversity of the forest.

Acquisition of land is only the first critical step in protecting redwood forests. Once land has been purchased, the League and our partners begin the never-ending work of ensuring that the redwood forest has the proper care to thrive. We support a comprehensive vision of forest conservation that includes working forests as well as protected parks and lands. This model ensures the long-term economic viability of the forest, preventing it from being developed or converted for other uses. Meanwhile, old-growth stands and wildlife habitats are preserved.

Visit our Restoration and Managing and Stewarding Land pages to learn how we protect redwood forests in perpetuity through holistic stewardship.


How We Protect Redwoods

Watching for coyotes, bears and mountain lions, llamas guarded a goat herd that rid meadows of invasive bull thistle in 2014 and 2015 on the League's Cape Vizcaino property. Photo by Mike Shoys

Managing and Stewarding Land

Learn about our approach to managing held lands. See example of our current stewardship projects.

The League has helped develop dozens of redwood parks and reserves. Photo by Paolo Vescia.

Creating Parks and Reserves
 

Find out how we safeguard land. See how many acres of redwood forest you’ve helped protect.

RCCI researcher collecting data. Photo by Steve Sillett.

Studying Redwoods
 

Learn more about how we study redwood forests and surrounding land and waterways to understand how to best protect them.

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