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Projects

Red Hill

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This forest was one of the world’s last unprotected giant sequoia properties. Red Hill is a spectacular property on the South Fork of the Tule River that supports more than 100 ancient giant sequoia and a mixed coniferous forest teeming with wildlife.

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Residual old-growth redwoods rise above a second-growth stand in Redwood National and State Parks. Photo by Mike Shoys

Redwoods Rising

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Together with our conservation partners, we are taking action to put the redwood homeland back on the path to vibrance and vitality. We call this collaboration Redwoods Rising, and we are focusing our efforts in and around Redwood National and State Parks. We will acquire land near established parks, connect preserves, heal damaged forests, and expand opportunities for visitors to the redwoods. We have the opportunity to create the redwood forest of the future, a forest of giants rising from the coastal mists of the historic range of Sequoia sempervirens.

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Vote "Yes" on Prop 68 to help preserve the peace and beauty of the redwood forests for future generations to come. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Prop 68: The Clean Water and Safe Parks Act

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On June 5, 2018, voters will have the opportunity to pass Prop 68, authorizing $4.1 billion in bond funding for parks, natural resource protection, climate adaptation, water quality and supply, and flood protection. If approved by voters in June, the measure would enable the League to continue protecting and stewarding our beautiful redwood forests.

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15-acre addition to the Grove of Old Trees park

The Grove of Old Trees

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Save the Redwoods League has expanded the Grove of Old Trees park to 48 acres by purchasing a neighboring 15-acre property and deeding it to LandPaths, the Grove’s owner and manager. Containing old-growth coast redwoods, oak woodland, grassland and a stretch of Coleman Valley Creek, this newly acquired property is a priority identified by the League’s Vibrant Forests Plan.

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Add your voice to keep our beloved monuments intact, including the pictured Giant Sequoia National Monument. Photo by William Croft

Defending Our National Monuments

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Early in 2017, the Trump administration signed an Executive Order (external link) directing the Department of the Interior Secretary, Ryan Zinke, to review the status of 27 national monuments. Such a review has never been undertaken in our nation’s history. … Continued

You can help remove this pavement to return this site to the surrounding forest. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Prairie Creek Scenic Corridor

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We made significant steps forward in our 90-year history of protecting lands in the Prairie Creek Scenic Corridor, a patchwork of private property surrounded by parks. The League transferred two properties to Redwood National Park. The 5.9-acre Berry Glen Trail Connection secures crucial wildlife habitat and important trail connections to the park’s two largest ancient redwood groves. The other property, a 2.5-acre parcel, attracts elk herds and the tourists who love to watch them.

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Mailliard Ranch

Mailliard Ranch

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Mailliard Ranch. is the largest undivided family-owned property in southern Mendocino County. Moreover, with nearly 12,000 acres of redwood and mixed conifer groves, including nearly 1,000 acres of towering old-growth redwood forest, it is the largest expanse of redwood forest still in private family hands in the coast range. Together, we met two major funding goals to protect the largest remaining family-owned redwood forest.

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The Toumey Trail in Richardson Grove State Park crosses a corner of the Twin Trees forest. Photo by Mike Shoys

Twin Trees Forest

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A walk among the hushed stands of 300-foot-tall ancient giants in Richardson Grove State Park is a sensory journey back in time. Many of the trees are more than 1,000 years old, and among the world’s tallest. To protect this jewel of a park from potential threats on a neighboring property called Twin Trees, Save the Redwoods League recently purchased a conservation easement from land owner Lost Coast Forestlands.

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Stewarts Point.

Stewarts Point Stewardship Project

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Nestled along the Sonoma County coast, the Stewarts Point Ranch property is blanketed with redwood and Douglas-fir forest, with a fringe of beautiful grasslands along its half-mile of coastline. Steelhead swim in the sparkling South Fork of the Gualala River, which runs the length of the eastern border.

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Your gift will forever protect Westfall Ranch’s beautiful forest and meadows, a buffer for the Headwaters Forest Reserve, home of an ancient redwood forest.

Westfall Ranch

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Thanks to our donors’ generous gifts, Save the Redwoods League has forever protected the scenic 77-acre Westfall Ranch and buffered the famous Headwaters Forest Reserve just south of Eureka, California.

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The Enchanted Forest is part of the Shady Dell property. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Shady Dell

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For more than 100 years, this forest was a private, hidden treasure. Your generous gifts enabled Save the Redwoods League to buy the 957-acre Shady Dell and plan its restoration. Now we’re working to open its wonders to you.

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You can protect and open Loma Mar Redwoods to the public. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Loma Mar Redwoods

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You Can Visit Your New Park Addition Thanks to donations from generous Save the Redwoods League members like you, a magical forest of big redwoods is ready for you to walk its wide, welcoming trails. Now part of San Mateo County’s Memorial … Continued

Bennett Juniper.

Bennett Juniper Stewardship Project

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This extraordinary tree is under Save the Redwoods’ protection in California’s Stanislaus National Forest because The Nature Conservancy conveyed it and the surrounding buffering land to us in 1987. Before then, rancher JW Martin Sr. protected the tree until donating it and the surrounding three acres in 1978 to The Nature Conservancy.

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Your gifts helped to repair a collapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the Skunk Train's famous Redwood Route to the Noyo River Redwoods, which you protected. Smiles have returned to riders' faces, as in this 2011 image. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Noyo River Redwoods

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In 2011, you helped us buy Noyo River Redwoods, a magical ancient forest you can see only by the historic Skunk Train. Recently you came to the rescue again. Your gifts helped to repair acollapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the train’s famous Redwood Route last April. Full train service—from Willits to Northspur and from Fort Bragg to Northspur—has been restored.

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