Giant sequoia on Alder Creek. Photo by Max Forster, Save the Redwoods League

Stay safe and informed during the pandemic

Put Safety First

Daily life in California and beyond has changed dramatically in response to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19). Our first priority is to ensure the health and safety of our staff, partners, and community members. We are closely monitoring the situation and taking guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health authorities.

In keeping with those recommendations, we are closing our physical office, and our staff will be working from home. We are fully equipped to keep our conservation activities moving forward remotely and will remain operational as we weather this crisis.

In the meantime, please stay safe and follow all directives from your local, state, and federal public health officials:

Your safety and that of your loved ones should be your first concern. While many redwood parks have cancelled group programs and closed visitor centers and museums, many trails and outdoor areas remain open to the public. Again, it is greatly encouraged that people follow guidelines for social distancing to remain safe.

We’re tracking a list of redwood park closures. In all instances, it is best to check the website for any park you plan to visit ahead of time. You can find those links to park agency websites on ExploreRedwoods.org.

 

Last updated: Wednesday, March 25, 2020 

 


 

Redwoods Resources

 

Redwood park closures

The League has compiled a list of all current redwood park closures* related to COVID-19.

*This list is subject to constant change, so you are advised to look at the website to any redwood park prior to visiting.

 

Learning materials

With widespread school closures, many parents have kids at home and are looking for educational opportunities. The League has a wide array of fun worksheets, lessons, videos, and other stuff that is perfect for this time. Check out our Learning Center.

Redwood foliage at the treetop is distinctive from foliage on branches lower in the crown. It often stands erect and has small, tightly clasping leaves, such as this 254‐foot‐tall treetop bearing male and female cones in Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Photo by Stephen Sillett, Institute for Redwood Ecology, Humboldt State University
Redwood foliage at the treetop is distinctive from foliage on branches lower in the crown. It often stands erect and has small, tightly clasping leaves, such as this 254‐foot‐tall treetop bearing male and female cones in Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Photo by Stephen Sillett, Institute for Redwood Ecology, Humboldt State University

Virtual experiences

For those stuck at home unable to venture to the redwood parks, there are some fantastic virtual opportunities available.

 

Social media

Be sure to keep up with current updates on our social media pages:

 

CONTACT US

membership@SaveTheRedwoods.org

 

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