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Introducing the Nature-Deprived to the Forest

Young students (like the one above with Sam Hodder, League President and CEO) joined the League and other organizations at last spring's BioBlitz to inventory plant and animal species in Muir Woods National Monument. Your gifts support such League projects to introduce new generations to the wonder of the redwoods, improving their health and well-being as they learn about the forest. Photo by Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell
Young students (like the one above with Sam Hodder, League President and CEO) joined the League and other organizations at last spring’s BioBlitz to inventory plant and animal species in Muir Woods National Monument. Your gifts support such League projects to introduce new generations to the wonder of the redwoods, improving their health and well-being as they learn about the forest. Photo by Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

Teenager Risa Padilla lives in Oakland, California, in the shadow of Redwood Regional Park, home of the largest remaining natural stand of coast redwoods in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area. For Oakland’s 400,000 residents, the forest of 15-story redwoods offers nearby inspiration and access to the wild territory of golden eagles, rainbow trout and more. Thanks to your generous gifts, Padilla recently visited the park for the first time through the Save the Redwoods League Education Program. She smiled as she recalled her school trip. “The trees are so huge, it really makes you feel like a little ant. It’s a humbling experience,” she said. Like most of her Oakland Technical High School classmates, she had never experienced this local park’s beauty. Such detachment from nature is a trend among children nationwide. Of Americans ages 6 and older, only half participated in outdoor recreation in 2012, according to The Outdoor Foundation’s Outdoor Participation Report 2013, which is based on a scientific survey of 26,000 households. Half of humanity lives in cities, the United Nations (UN) shows. Eighty-two percent of the United States population lives in urban areas, and the UN projects continued urban growth.

Redwoods Strengthen Us

As a redwoods enthusiast, you likely have always known that spending time in nature makes you feel good. Well now you have proof: Studies consistently demonstrate that spending time in nature improves people’s mental and physical condition. So says an academic literature review by Deakin University and Parks Victoria in Australia. The review cites three studies showing that exposure to natural environments such as parks enhances the ability to cope with and recover from stress, illness and injury. Most urbanites can only experience nature by visiting parks, and most of them are unaware of parks and their potential health benefits, the review says. Making people healthier is a great reason for the League to connect more people with redwood parks. As a member of the League, you make it possible for young people to experience the wonder of the redwoods, enriching their lives and fostering the conservationists of tomorrow. Please renew your membership or join today to support programs like this one. Continue reading this story to learn about our new ways of connecting people with redwoods, and learn how else you’re making a difference. Tell us what you think of our Summer Bulletin, and if you’re one of the first 40 survey respondents, you will win our new reusable utensil set!


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Stephen Sillett and Marie Antoine climbing Muir Woods redwoods.

BioBlitz 2014: Muir Woods National Monument

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In March 2014, a research team sponsored by Save the Redwoods League and the Evelyn Tilden Mohrhardt Fund at The San Francisco Foundation became the first scientists to climb the ancient trees at Muir Woods National Monument and survey life in the canopy. Learn more about this historic climb and its results.


A generous bequest resulted in the League's support of the new visitor center at Calaveras Big Trees State Park. You can plan a trip to this redwood park.

Members’ Generosity Helps Open New Calaveras Visitor Center

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Now James and Carmen Hickling’s love for Calaveras Big Trees lives on through a generous bequest, which supported construction of the park’s new visitor center. The center hosted a grand opening last Memorial Day. This new center honors the legacy of those who preserved these groves in the past, and tells the story of the giant sequoias.


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