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In the first year, researchers will develop and publicly release genome sequences using a tree from the pictured Butano State Park for the coast redwood genome and a tree from Sequoia National Park for the giant sequoia genome.

Groundbreaking Project to Map the Redwood Genomes

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Save the Redwoods League is leading pioneering research to fully sequence the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes. The genome sequences and the screening tools developed will allow researchers to quickly assess genetic diversity in redwood forests to inform plans that restore the health and resilience of these forests as they face environmental stressors such as climate change.

Learn more in the inaugural edition of Redwoods magazine.

With your annual membership of $19 or more, you’ll receive a year’s subscription to Redwoods, the new magazine of Save the Redwoods League.

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Sequoia National Park.

New Initiative to Sequence the Redwood Genomes

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We are sequencing the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes. While the first steps in this project will happen in the laboratory, the goal is to rapidly put this new understanding of redwood DNA to work for conservation. To support vigorous coast redwood and giant sequoia forests in the decades ahead, we will need to protect not only the remarkable structure of the forest, but also protect the genetic diversity that underlies it.

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Pleasant Surprises at Portola Redwoods State Park

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Whenever we decide to go hiking, we always do research to find out a bit about the park first. Just little things such as location, how long it will take us to get there, accessibility, and, of course, what the weather will be like. In doing so, we will often come across interesting facts such as trees of some notoriety, but our number one criterion is the variety of trails because it does no good to go to a park if there are no trails suitable for me to hike. For these reasons, Portola Redwoods State Park fit our criteria.

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Orick Mill

Drone’s-Eye View of the Orick Mill Site

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When you drive north on Highway 101, just past the small town of Orick, you will begin to marvel at the giant redwoods of Redwood National and State Parks. There is no sign letting you know you have arrived; you just slowly become shaded by the great canopies towering above you.

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A National Monument for the Santa Cruz Coast?

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On the Santa Cruz coast, surrounding the picturesque town of Davenport, is a sweeping expanse of native coastal prairie and redwood forest. This beautiful landscape is special not only for what it is, a local historical and ecological treasure, but for what it could become — our next national monument.

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Many of the most magnificent redwood parks and reserves you and generations of Americans have enjoyed, including Redwood National Park pictured above, have been partially funded by the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Photo by Max Forster

Celebrating the NPS Centennial in the Redwoods

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Over the weekend, the League celebrated the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service at our Orick Mill Site property near Redwood National and State Parks. It was a momentous event, and I was honored to speak to the attendees about the significance of the moment. For those who weren’t able to be there, I’ll take the opportunity to share my remarks, and some photos, here.

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The Enchanted Forest is part of the Shady Dell property. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Shady Dell

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For more than 100 years, this forest was a private, hidden treasure. Your generous gifts enabled Save the Redwoods League to buy the 957-acre Shady Dell and plan its restoration. Now we’re working to open its wonders to you.

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The study found that although trees within 5 meters of each other (like these here) were more likely to be clones than trees farther away, they weren’t always. Photo by Jason Hollinger, Flickr Creative Commons

Some Coast Redwoods May Seem to Be Clones, but They’re Not

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If you’ve visited a coast redwood forest, you’ve probably seen these trees growing around the stump of a logged giant. These “fairy rings,” as they’re known informally, show how the coast redwood reproduces asexually by sending new sprouts up from the trunk base of a parent redwood. The mystery was whether these sprouts are genetically identical copies of the parent redwood. Because 95 percent of the current coast redwood range is younger forests, understanding the genetics of the coast redwood is critical for conservation and restoration. Learn more about this research.

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Justin Faggioli is Save the Redwoods League Board of Directors Secretary.

Justin Faggioli: Developing Strategies for a Leafy Future

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After college earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth sciences at Stanford University, Justin Faggioli spent three years working as a geologist, primarily on projects in Alaska. His job took him to some of the most remote areas of the state, most of the time in a helicopter. In addition to the geologic work, Justin was able to enjoy the beautiful flora, amazing fauna and spectacular scenery.

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Peter Frazier at the San Vicente Redwoods property.

Peter B. Frazier: Making Wise Decisions in Changing Times

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Peter B. Frazier, Save the Redwoods League Board of Directors Treasurer, comes from entrepreneurial pioneer stock. When his great grandfather was only 19 years old, he headed from Boston Harbor around Cape Horn to the then-tiny town of San Francisco. Like thousands of people from around the world, he made the long journey to look for gold.

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Green Cones Go Red

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Typically, cones mature on the redwood branches in autumn. They turn slightly yellow as the cone scales separate, exposing the seeds hidden within to the elements. Rain then washes away tannic crystals that hold the seeds inside the cones and … Continued