Skip to main content

A Bright Future for Redwoods

Relictual old-growth coast redwood forest groves stand today as islands in a harvested landscape at Redwood National and State Parks. Photo credit: Mike Shoys
Relictual old-growth coast redwood forest groves stand today as islands in a harvested landscape at Redwood National and State Parks. Photo credit: Mike Shoys
Our majestic coast redwood parks are remarkable for their old-growth forests with towering trees and primeval qualities. A majority of these parks, however, also contain vast stretches of historically logged redwood forest, a legacy of the timber industry that cut more than 2 million acres of coast redwood forest since the Gold Rush in California.

The survival of fragmented old-growth groves depends on the health of the forests that surround them, therefore conservation and restoration of these younger second-growth forests has become an increased priority.

Today, we proudly announced a bold commitment to invest in the health of logged redwood landscapes, so that the cutover forests can heal from the damage of the past and redwood giants can rise once again. The League’s newly released State of Redwoods Conservation Report and Centennial Vision for Redwoods Conservation demand continued action because what we have protected is not fully saved until we restore the lands surrounding the last remaining stands of old-growth redwoods.

In a collaborative called Redwoods Rising, Save the Redwoods League has teamed up with California State Parks and the National Park Service to do more redwood restoration together than we could individually within Redwood National and State Parks.

By combining our resources and expertise, we will restore 10,000 acres of forest in the next five years and steward these lands toward a brighter future. Our public-private effort will use a science-based approach to set restoration priorities and design treatments to heal the logged forests within the parks that surround the tallest trees on Earth. Together with our parks partners, we are fulfilling our commitment to the stewardship of these magnificent forests that we have all worked to protect.

I invite you to learn more about Redwoods Rising initiative and to go out and explore our incredible redwood parks.


Tags: , , , ,


About Paul Ringgold

Paul Ringgold has been an outdoor enthusiast his entire life, and he has dedicated his career to conservation and land management. As the Chief Program Officer for Save the Redwoods League, Paul oversees all land conservation transactions, land stewardship and management activities, forest restoration programs, public funding and policy engagement, park support, as well as education and interpretive programs.



Save the Redwoods League Centennial Vision for Redwoods Conservation

A Bold, New Vision for the League’s Next 100 Years

on

Marking a critical moment in the 100-year history of Save the Redwoods League and the future of redwood forest conservation, we are releasing two defining documents: our State of Redwoods Conservation Report and Centennial Vision for Redwoods Conservation. They are the result of bold, aspirational visioning, robust strategic planning by the Council and Board of Directors of Save the Redwoods League, and extensive scientific research conducted by the League’s professional staff and partners.


Celebrate the redwoods this Earth Day! Photo by Ken Susman

7 Ways to Get Involved with the League on Earth Day

on

Earth Day is on April 22, and with it, a worldwide celebration in honor of our planet’s natural wonders. Here are seven ways to celebrate our remarkable redwood forests on Earth Day, join in on the League’s 100th birthday festivities and honor these majestic giants during the Year of the Redwoods!

See the seven ways to celebrate our remarkable redwood forests on Earth Day and join in on the League’s 100th birthday festivities.


Leave a Reply

Top