forest restoration

Two female restoration workers in neon-green vests smile in front of a partially burned sequia forest

So long, Long Meadow, we’re packed for Packsaddle!

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As winter approaches, Save the Redwoods League staff are raising mugs of hot cocoa to toast a wildly productive work season in the giant sequoia range. The big win: Completing risk-reduction and wildfire resilience work in Long Meadow Grove, which …

Two men in olive green state park uniforms with ranger hats smile as they speak to a woman in civilian clothes

Redwoods Rising celebrates 5 years of audacious optimism

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With a project as big and bold as Redwoods Rising—an endeavor that will take decades to complete—it’s all about celebrating big milestones along the way. So on a sunny Thursday afternoon in September, project partners Save the Redwoods League, California …

3 uniformed rangers of the US Forest Service and one man in checkered shirt and jeans notetaking in a Giant Sequoia forest

Emergency restoration resumes in a famed giant sequoia grove

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Save the Redwoods League this month resumed emergency restoration work for 2023 on a beloved giant sequoia grove to reduce fuels and the risk of severe climate-driven wildfires. In partnership with the USDA Forest Service, the League is restoring the …

Field researcher wearing yellow hardhat and orange vest

Unprecedented restoration project makes great strides

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The most ambitious coast redwood forest restoration project ever launched marked great progress in 2022, its third year of operation on the ground. In the effort called Redwoods Rising, Save the Redwoods League, the National Park Service, and California State Parks are restoring thousands of acres of forests in Redwood National and State Parks.

CLARK SIMPSON

On the Front Lines of Redwood Forest Restoration

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A recent partnership was announced between the State of California and the U.S. Forest Service, which will work together on state and federal forests and rangelands to reduce wildfire risks, restore watersheds, protect habitat and biological diversity, and help the state meet its climate objectives.

Apprentices and field leads on a field tour of the Greater Mill Creek project area as part of their orientation. Photo by Ryan Thompson

Our Redwoods Rising Apprentices Had a World-Expanding Summer—and So Did I

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As the manager of the Redwoods Rising Apprenticeship program, I don’t get out in the field very often, but I get to see growth in the apprentices in snapshots. It’s remarkable to me how a short 11 weeks can contribute to a young person’s life. I’m so grateful that I can help to provide an invaluable experience to people only just beginning their careers.

Redwoods Rising Botany Apprentice, Len Mazur, gazes up at the towering canopies of ancient coast redwood while mapping invasive plant species in Prairie Creek. Photo by Ryan Thompson

Notes from the North: Restoration in Action

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This summer launched the first season of the Redwoods Rising Apprenticeship, adding capacity to the effort of landscape restoration in Redwood National and State Parks. Len Mazur, a student at Humboldt State University and Redwoods Rising Apprentice on the botany crew, writes about his experiences helping to restore this fragile and resilient landscape.

Relictual old-growth coast redwood forest groves stand today as islands in a harvested landscape at Redwood National and State Parks. Photo credit: Mike Shoys

A Bright Future for Redwoods

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We proudly announced a bold commitment to invest in the health of logged redwood landscapes, so that the cutover forests can heal from the damage of the past and redwood giants can rise once again. In a collaborative called Redwoods Rising, Save the Redwoods League has teamed up with California State Parks and the National Park Service to do more redwood restoration together than we could individually within Redwood National and State Parks.

Leonel Arguello addresses the crowd at the League's Annual Meeting 2013. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Leonel Arguello Seeks Restoration of Redwood Ecosystems in RNSP

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Arguello has worked at Redwood National and State Parks ever since, and he is now Joint Chief of Resource Management and Science, often collaborating with partners such as the League to implement restoration projects. Today, his foremost task as chief is much the same as when he was hired as a student so many years ago: help restore the park’s world-renowned redwood ecosystems.

One year after decommissioning, native plants have grown on a former logging road at Headwaters Forest Reserve. Redwood seedlings were planted as part of the restoration. Photo by Humboldt State University.

Restoring the Forest to Benefit Wildlife, People, Climate

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Protecting the redwood forest isn’t just about preservation — it’s also about restoration. Save the Redwoods League helps restore habitat for wildlife that depends on ancient forests. With your gifts, we also speed development of tomorrow’s beautiful old-growth groves. These groves will help mitigate climate-changing greenhouse gases, and they’ll provide clean water for people and animals.

Orick Mill

Drone’s-Eye View of the Orick Mill Site

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When you drive north on Highway 101, just past the small town of Orick, you will begin to marvel at the giant redwoods of Redwood National and State Parks. There is no sign letting you know you have arrived; you just slowly become shaded by the great canopies towering above you.

Your gift will forever protect Westfall Ranch’s beautiful forest and meadows, a buffer for the Headwaters Forest Reserve, home of an ancient redwood forest.

Westfall Ranch

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Thanks to our donors’ generous gifts, Save the Redwoods League has forever protected the scenic 77-acre Westfall Ranch and buffered the famous Headwaters Forest Reserve just south of Eureka, California.

Shady Dell trail

Shady Dell

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For more than 100 years, this forest was a private, hidden treasure. Your generous gifts enabled Save the Redwoods League to buy the 957-acre Shady Dell and plan its restoration.

Steve Prokop, Superintendent, Redwood National Park

Steve Prokop: Guardian of a Park that Belongs to the World

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Before his appointment in 2013 as Superintendent of Redwood National Park, Steve Prokop supervised Kalaupapa National Historical Park in Hawaii. Most people would consider the two parks greatly dissimilar. Kalaupapa, located on the island of Molokai, is tropical. Its essential …

Justin Faggioli is Save the Redwoods League Board of Directors Secretary.

Justin Faggioli: Developing Strategies for a Leafy Future

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After college earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth sciences at Stanford University, Justin Faggioli spent three years working as a geologist, primarily on projects in Alaska. His job took him to some of the most remote areas of the state, most of the time in a helicopter. In addition to the geologic work, Justin was able to enjoy the beautiful flora, amazing fauna and spectacular scenery.

Hare Creek rushes past redwoods in Limekiln State Park. League donors’ support recently helped replace a bridge reconnecting the camping area to all of the park’s trails. © Russ Bishop, Alamy Stock Photo

Work Showcases Limekiln, a Big Sur Treasure

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Building upon our founders’ dream of protecting and enhancing redwood parks, the League is now engaged in a wide range of activities — from saving threatened redwood landscapes and restoring forests, to upgrading park amenities, expanding education and interpretative programs, and finding new ways to benefit parks and visitors. One such project is under way at Limekiln State Park.

Yosemite National Park

Revitalizing Mariposa Grove with Rx Fire

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At Yosemite National Park this week, you may see smoke curling up from Mariposa Grove, the spectacular giant sequoia forest that catalyzed the conservation movement 150 years ago. This smoke is part of a planned prescribed burn in the forest to lower fuel loads that have accumulated over many decades of fire suppression.

John Montague and his daughter.

John Montague: Finder of the Tallest Trees and a Dedicated Supporter

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When redwoods enthusiast John Montague first volunteered at Save the Redwoods League, he began by assisting with chores at the office. He’s so dedicated to the forest that soon after he volunteered out in the field, mapping, taking measurements, and identifying notable trees under the League’s direction.