USDA Forest Service (Pacific Southwest Region)

A study found that thinned areas supported higher populations of prey species for the endangered northern spotted owl (pictured) and the rare Humboldt marten.

Thinning Stands Boosts Wildlife Diversity

on

For many years, selective thinning has been considered a potential tool for accelerating old-growth forest characteristics in the dense stands of young trees that typically cover harvested redwood lands. Now, research by the US Forest Service has confirmed the wisdom of thinning, or removing select trees to reduce competition in a stand. Learn more about this research.

... Continued
Good giant sequoia regeneration was strongly associated with canopy gaps. Photo by Marc D. Meyer

Promoting Giant Sequoia Regeneration

on

Giant sequoias can live for thousands of years, but they sometimes have difficulty getting started. Unlike coast redwoods, giant sequoias rarely sprout from their bases. Their reproductive future lies in their tiny (0.2-inch-long) seeds, which need just the right combination of soil, sun and moisture to survive. Learn more about this research.

... Continued

Join our newsletter

Get the latest redwood updates in your inbox
   Please leave this field empty