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The League worked on a 1990 settlement that banned commercial logging in what is now Giant Sequoia National Monument. William Croft, League Board of Directors Member, took this photo in 1989 as he mapped the groves’ boundaries.
The League worked on a 1990 settlement that banned commercial logging in what is now Giant Sequoia National Monument. William Croft, League Board of Directors Member, took this photo in 1989 as he mapped the groves’ boundaries.
Save the Redwoods League thanks our community for responding to our call for public comments on what Giant Sequoia National Monument means to them. Comments from League supporters were counted among a record-breaking 2.8 million after the Trump administration ordered a review of certain national monuments. The review threatens protections for 27 incredible places, including Giant Sequoia, and undermines conservation successes made under the 1906 Antiquities Act. Save the Redwoods League will be as active and committed to defending the monument as we were in helping to create it years ago.

More than 99 percent of comments submitted to Regulations.gov supported our public lands; 95 percent of comments about Giant Sequoia National Monument supported maintaining current boundaries. This monument protects natural wonders that exist nowhere else, supports local jobs, keeps clean water flowing to farms downstream, and helps mitigate climate change. The ancient groves, archeological sites and other special objects in the monument are an irreplaceable part of our nation’s heritage. As of today, the fate of Giant Sequoia National Monument was unknown. Please check League publications, this website and our social media for updates.

Learn more about Giant Sequoia National Monument.


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