Author Archives: Save the Redwoods League

Since 1918, Save the Redwoods League has protected and restored redwood forests and connected people with their peace and beauty so these wonders of the natural world flourish.

Your support enabled repair of this seasonal bridge, which allows visitors to reach campsites, parking and trails at Standish-Hickey State Park.

Bridge, Tunnel Open, Thanks to You

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  • Thanks to your gifts, the seasonal Standish-Hickey bridge is now open, restoring visitor access for the first time in three years to 61 stunning redwoods campsites.
  • Skunk Train service from Willits has resumed after your League gifts enabled repair of a collapsed tunnel. Riding the train is the only way to see the ancient Noyo River Redwoods that you protected in 2011. Service from Fort Bragg is expected to resume later this month.
Your support enabled repair of this seasonal bridge, which allows visitors to reach campsites, parking and trails at Standish-Hickey State Park.

Your Support Returned a Bridge to the Redwoods

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Thanks to your gifts, California State Parks reinstalled a seasonal bridge across the Eel River, restoring visitor access for the first time in three years to 61 stunning redwoods campsites at Standish-Hickey State Recreation Area (external link). The bridge also allows access to the giant Standish tree, miles of forest trails, a sparkling swimming hole and day-use parking. The bridge and campground are open, so go enjoy the magnificent redwoods at Standish-Hickey and know that you made a difference here. Thank you!

Your gifts helped to repair a collapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the Skunk Train's famous Redwood Route to the Noyo River Redwoods, which you protected. Smiles have returned to riders' faces, as in this 2011 image. Photo by Paolo Vescia

You’re Keeping an Ancient Forest Reachable

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You helped us buy Noyo River Redwoods, a magical ancient forest you can see only by the historic Skunk Train, in 2011. Recently you came to the rescue again. Your gifts helped to repair a collapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the train’s famous Redwood Route last April. The tunnel is now open and full Skunk Train service has resumed. You can make sure we’re ready to protect and provide you access to amazing forests like this one: Please donate today.

Visit a redwood park, capture your trip with a camera, then enter our photo contest! Photo by Jon Parmentier, finalist in the 2010 Online Photo Contest.

Have What It Takes to Capture a Giant and Inspire a Generation?

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA (July 2, 2013)—Save the Redwoods League, the only nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting ancient redwood forests throughout their natural range, today announced its online photo contest to raise awareness and protect redwood forests. The League’s Know Wonder© online photo contest invites U.S. residents to capture every angle of the redwood forest, from the smallest critters inhabiting the forest floor to the magnificence of the tree canopy, for a chance to win prizes. Through this photo contest the League encourages contest participants to experience one of the most unique ecosystems in the world. View and download the full press release.

Noyo River Redwoods. Photo by Julie Martin

Save the Redwoods League and the Skunk Train Work Together to Reopen the Historic ‘Redwood Route’ and Preserve Old-Growth Forest

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA (June 18, 2013)—Save the Redwoods League, the only nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting ancient redwood forests throughout their natural range, announced today that it has reached an agreement with the Mendocino Railway, owners and operators of the famous Skunk Train, to provide $300,000 to acquire an option for purchase of a conservation easement that will permanently protect the ancient redwoods along the train’s famous “Redwoods Route” including the Noyo River Watershed. View and download the full press release.

Cape Vizcaino shelters old-growth redwood forest, grasslands, chaparral and beautiful, rugged coastline.

Protecting Wildlife and Redwoods at Cape Vizcaino

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Restoration efforts are underway at remote and wild Cape Vizcaino, a property in Mendocino County sheltering old-growth redwood forest, grasslands, chaparral and beautiful, rugged coastline. The forest here was formerly managed for logging and ranching. Now, guided by an ecologically-minded forest management plan, the League and our partners are poised to begin healing this land. Learn more about the restoration efforts at Cape Vizcaino.

Photo by Bob Wick

You Can Open the Gate to a Hidden Sequoia World

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Southeast of Three Rivers in the Sierra Nevada is a kingdom of giant sequoias reachable on foot, mountain bike and horseback. Ancient giants here measure as much as 16 feet across, likely wider than your dining room. Save the Redwoods League is working with Sequoia Riverlands Trust and the Bureau of Land Management to buy Craig Ranch and provide easy access to the majestic ancient trees. Learn more about this purchase and how your gift can be matched.

Photo by Paolo Vescia

First-Ever Parent’s Guide to Redwoods Offers Travel Tips, Activities and More!

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA (May 14, 2013)—Before you pack up your vehicle full of camping gear this summer be sure to download Save the Redwoods League’s new Parent’s Guide to the Coast Redwoods. This first edition provides travel tips, activities and more for parents that want to introduce children to the wonders of the redwood forest. It is chock-full of inside information on where to go, what to pack, and what to do to make the most of the experience. This valuable resource will help the busy parent, grandparent, family member or guardian plan a memorable, fun-filled adventure into the forest. View and download the full press release.

High-severity treatments have boosted the growth of isolated giant sequoias in what is now Giant Sequoia National Monument. Photo by Rob York

Disturbances Benefit Giant Sequoias

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Being dwarfed by Earth’s most massive tree, the giant sequoia, fills you with wonder. It’s hard to believe that a living thing can be so enormous and old. It may be alarming to see these forests on fire, but research funded by your gifts shows that disturbances such as these are actually good for giant sequoias. See why.

New California State Parks Director, Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (Ret.), left, continues his organization's 90-year relationship with the League. He's pictured here with Jim Larson, League Board of Directors President.

New Parks Leader Committed to State’s Treasures

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Save the Redwoods League and California State Parks have worked together to protect parklands for some 90 years. So it’s not too surprising that the new California State Parks Director, Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (Ret.), lunched with the Save the Redwoods League Council on his third week on the job.

Your donations helped protect Hendy Woods State Park's magical ancient forest (pictured) by keeping the park open and by securing matching funds to repair water lines there.

Your Gifts Secure Match for Park Improvements

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Your generous donations recently helped obtain matching funds for essential operating expenses and infrastructure projects at three amazing redwood parks that faced closure: Portola Redwoods, Hendy and Standish-Hickey. Totaling $130,000, your gifts helped cover operational shortfalls and plans for improvements of septic systems, campsites, shelters, bridges and more. Now these parks will receive more than $1 million from the State Parks and Recreation Fund and matching funds from California Assembly Bill 1478. Thank you!

Our Redwood Watch map shows the coast redwood range in orange and giant sequoia range in red. You can help scientists research the effects of climate change on redwood forests by taking photos that will be placed on this map. Map by iNaturalist

Help Research: Photograph South, East Parts of Redwood Range

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Today, redwoods stand at a critical point. The current and projected interactions of these stressors jeopardize more than 90 years of League conservation work. We must act today to protect redwoods from these threats in the future. Learn more about you can help.

Fran Wolfe and her husband Cameron Wolfe enjoy the grove he dedicated to her in Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park.

Valentine’s Day: From the Ultimate Gift to New Ecards

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You may celebrate Valentine’s Day with chocolates or a bouquet of red roses. But Piedmont, California, attorney Cameron Wolfe gave his wife Fran something much bigger: He worked with Save the Redwoods League to dedicate the Fran B. Wolfe Redwood Grove in Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park.

You can help protect Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest (pictured), a rare ancient  forest in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Save the Redwoods League raises $4 million to protect some of the tallest and oldest redwood forests left in the Santa Cruz Mountains

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA (January 29, 2013)—Save the Redwoods League, the only nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting redwood forests throughout their natural range, reached its first major milestone by raising half of the $8 million cost to protect some of the tallest and oldest redwood forests left in San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties. To succeed, the League must raise the remaining $4 million by December 31, 2013, to complete protection of the stunning Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest in San Mateo County and protect Boulder Creek Forest in Santa Cruz County with a conservation agreement. View and download the full press release.

You can help protect Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest (pictured), a rare ancient  forest in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Photo by Paolo Vescia

You Can Protect 4 Santa Cruz Mountains Forests

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Wonderful redwoods enthusiasts like you contributed the $100,000 needed to gain a matching gift for San Vicente Redwoods, the largest unprotected redwood forest in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Pete and Patty Mattson, long-time Save the Redwoods League members, generously donated the matching funds.

Credit: å© Michael Nichols/National Geographic

National Geographic Features League Research

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National Geographic magazine’s December cover story includes the remarkable findings of League scientists who are studying how redwoods can survive sweeping environmental changes. The feature includes incredible photos, such as a portrait of a 3,200-year-old giant sequoia.

If we do not purchase and protect this land today, we could lose forever the opportunity to make this ancient forest available to the public. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Save the Redwoods League launches fundraising efforts to protect some of the tallest and oldest redwood forests left in the Santa Cruz Mountains

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA (November 19, 2012)—Save the Redwoods League, the only nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting ancient redwood forests throughout their natural range, launched a public fundraising campaign today to seize a rare opportunity to protect some of the tallest and oldest redwood forests left in San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties. To succeed, the League must raise $2 million by the end of 2012, and an additional $6 million by the end of 2013, to purchase the stunning Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest in San Mateo County and protect the Boulder Creek Forest in Santa Cruz County with a conservation agreement. View and download the full press release.