Blog






A man with a beard and glasses standing in front of a park sign with a car in the background

Wishing our friend Bob Doyle at EBRPD well as he retires

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After starting as a ranger at East Bay Regional Park District and becoming its general manager, Bob Doyle retires after 47 years of looking after many of the Bay Area’s most treasured landscapes.


Video: League forest expert talks about redwoods and fire

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League Director of Science Kristen Shive, PhD, gave a talk about California’s unprecedented fire season in 2020 and its effects on our iconic coast redwood and giant sequoia forests.


Cascade Creek: The future resilience of a fire-impacted landscape is secured

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Save the Redwoods League has safeguarded the long-term health of a keystone forest with the December 2020 purchase of the Cascade Creek property, home to old-growth and mature second-growth redwoods in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The acquisition creates continuous habitat from the mountains to the Pacific Ocean within the ancestral territory of the Quiroste Tribe.


Burls protrude from a coast redwood

What is a burl?

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We’ve all seen them—those enormous growths on the trunks or bases of coast redwood trees, sometimes covered in new sprouts, sometimes appearing to drip down the side of the tree like the molten remnants of a lost limb. These strange formations are collectively known as burls.


Save the Redwoods and outdoors advocates from underrepresented communities visit the League’s Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve. Photo by Wondercamp

Hope and healing amid ongoing crises

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In this edition, we strive to depict a more holistic story of redwoods culture—one in which we all stand together to protect and restore these forests to which we are connected.


A white woman with red hair and bangs and an Indian man walk their large dog in Joaquin Miller, holding hands and smiling.

Redwoods Near You

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With many focusing on staycations this year, check out a few ideas for day trips. While parks are open again around California, many travelers are putting off big trips until the pandemic blows over. Thankfully for most Californians, redwoods are closer than you might think, and an inspiring day trip is well within reach.


A Latina woman who is a student leader for Latino Outdoors holding a pinecone and smiling

New Voices Reveal the Forest

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Molina is a Latino Outdoors outings leader, and with warmth and enthusiasm, she introduces video viewers to the forest’s history and wonders in her favorite park, which she always visits whenever she needs to feel grounded. Molina’s tour is among three Explore the Redwoods videos produced by Latino Outdoors and Save the Redwoods League to offer virtual trips to the coast redwoods and giant sequoia. The joint project advances the League’s mission to connect people of all backgrounds and identities to redwood forests.


Photo by Jack Dykinga

Indigenous Perspectives Are Crucial for Conservation

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After many years protecting Tribal lands and waters, and a lifetime in close relation with nature, why isn’t it easier for me to convey these concepts and perceptions? A deep tension persists between the things my heart knows and the fluency required for sharing them.


CLARK SIMPSON

On the Front Lines of Redwood Forest Restoration

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A recent partnership was announced between the State of California and the U.S. Forest Service, which will work together on state and federal forests and rangelands to reduce wildfire risks, restore watersheds, protect habitat and biological diversity, and help the state meet its climate objectives.


Damage in Big Basin building

Fire Recovery at the Core of New Parks Effort

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The fire at Big Basin Redwoods State Park made headlines around the world, but it was far from the only redwood park to burn. Sadly, each of the parks forced to close by fire had only recently been reopened following the state’s COVID-19 stay-home order.


Researcher climbing a giant sequoia tree

League Project Updates

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LEAGUE PURCHASE PROTECTS A CRUCIAL REDWOOD FOREST Andersonia West contains hundreds of acres of old-growth coast redwoods and is a critical habitat corridor for imperiled species on the remote Lost Coast. Learn More   PHOTO EVIDENCE THAT REDWOODS RISING IS …



A view of wildfire damage in Big Basin, taken from the forest floor angled up to see the canopy.

How Will Redwoods Fare Under Wildfires in a Changing Climate?

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In the giant sequoia range, roughly 16,000 acres (or 34 percent of the range) had burned, most of which is old growth. We have yet to assess the fire effects on the ground, but as with most modern wildfires, there will likely be a mix of beneficial and detrimental ecological effects.


Historic photo of El Palo Alto tree

An Enduring Emblem: El Palo Alto

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In 1776 and 1777, the missions in San Francisco and Santa Clara were established (along with the Presidio), and the road connecting them was the El Camino Real, which passed right by El Palo Alto. Apart from some oaks, the only large tree on the 47-mile journey between the two missions was El Palo Alto, so it naturally became a famous landmark — it is currently listed as California Historical Landmark No. 2.