Blog


: LWCF helped make it possible for Save the Redwoods League to protect part of the Prairie Creek corridor and add the land to Redwood National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Photo by Max Forster

Celebrating the NPS Centennial in the Redwoods

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Over the weekend, the League celebrated the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service at our Orick Mill Site property near Redwood National and State Parks. It was a momentous event, and I was honored to speak to the attendees about the significance of the moment. For those who weren’t able to be there, I’ll take the opportunity to share my remarks, and some photos, here.


Join the Great American Backyard Campout

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Join us this Saturday as we spend the afternoon at Oakland’s Joaquin Miller Park, hiking and camping among the redwoods. League staff will lead a hike through the forest to talk about the state of the redwoods and how we need the public of all ages to help us monitor these amazing beauties.


Last-Minute Summer Camping Guide

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A group searching for a summer weekend campsite at the last minute is common, says Anderson. And scoring that weekend is far from impossible, with the right approach. Here’s how to squeeze in that spontaneous weekend trip to your favorite park.


Photo credit Latino Outdoors

Encontrando Mi Parque

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My journey exploring our public lands and the outdoors coincided with my journey inward, exploring my cultural identity. And as those paths intertwined, I came to realize that when we learn to feel a sense of ownership and responsibility for both our natural and cultural spaces, we have richer, fuller, and more empowering experiences.


Sequoia National Park under a blanket of white snow on a grey day.

Leaf to Landscape Project

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After the fourth consecutive year of severe drought in California, a team of scientists came together in the summer of 2015 to study the impacts of the historic drought on the world’s largest trees, the giant sequoias.


Student Perspectives: Keep Cool and Save the Redwoods

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We go through our lives doing similar things day after day. We wake up and check our phones, and then we go to school or work, and finally, finish our day running errands or relaxing. But there is one HUGE thing that most people don’t even see or realize is right in our backyard: There are redwood trees that we sometimes take for granted and might not really think about visiting.


Conservationists Hike 1,230 Miles of California Coast to Foster Spirit of Stewardship

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Hikers along the California Coastal Trail in Del Norte County have begun to mistake Morgan Visalli and Jocelyn Enevoldsen for twins. If you ignore Visalli’s blonde hair and Enevoldsen’s dark brunette braids and pay attention to the color spectrum that radiates around them, you can see it too. They wear matching turquoise rain coats, handkerchiefs, and socks.


Photo by Paolo Vescia

New Lost Coast Trail Extension Now Open

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The Lost Coast lends itself to adventure like nowhere else in California. As you explore this stunningly beautiful, remote expanse of coastal bluffs and forests, a true sense of discovery takes hold – it feels wonderfully wild and unchanged. With 100 miles of almost completely roadless beauty, this is the longest stretch of undeveloped coastline left in California. Small wonder that the spectacular trail that winds along the Lost Coast is a top-tier, bucket-list adventure for all who love to get into the wild. And now that trail is even better!


Kyle Da Silva, League Redwoods Reporter. Photo by Ella Teevan

The Understory

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In the tangle of our wireless world we are more connected than ever before. It’s puzzling, then, how distant we now find ourselves from the natural environment. While our world migrates into the cloud, the Redwoods Reporter series will keep a pair of boots on the trail with educators, adventurers, foresters, chefs, doctors, artists and scientists who are called back by the redwood forests.


Watch: The Future of Redwoods Conservation and Why You Should Care

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Those of us who have visited, learned about, or seen images of a redwood forest will understand the feeling of caring deeply about what happens to this ancient, unique, inspiring corner of the Earth. Listen to my talk to find out what threatens the redwoods today, how we can ensure that this irreplaceable forest will thrive into the future — and why you should care.


The redwood forest inspires the students in our Redwoods and Climate Change High School Program.

Redwood Haikus

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It is well known that the redwoods inspire people in many different ways. Some want to study how the trees and forest function; others hike beneath the branches for exercise, and still others paint and photograph these majestic beauties.


ave of giants

Experience the Redwoods from Afar in ‘Close Encounters’

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Reading the perspective of someone who has never seen a redwood forest, I got to vicariously experience the redwoods for the first time again. I wanted to share “Close Encounters with Coastal Giants” with you, so that you can enjoy it, too.


Student Perspectives: Have You Taken Advantage of Nature Yet?

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According to The Outdoor Foundation, just under half (49.2 percent) of Americans participated in an outdoor recreational activity in 2013. If you have not visited a national, local or state park lately, you are missing out on a great way to engage in outdoor recreation. Visiting parks not only supports a healthier lifestyle, but also an opportunity to learn.


Berkeley High students learning about redwood ecology.

Student Perspectives: From Student to Teacher at Redwood Regional Park

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One of my favorite places on Earth is Muir Woods, so when it was announced that we would be going to Redwood Regional Park as part of a field trip for my UC Berkeley/Save the Redwoods League joint internship, I was insanely excited.


Why Protect Redwoods Infographic

New Redwoods Infographic Shows Why You Should Protect Redwoods

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Did you know that redwoods have been around for millions of years, since dinosaurs and giant sloths roamed the earth? Did you know that the tallest redwood towers above a 37-story building? Our mighty redwoods are not only amazing in size and age, but they provide important benefits for people and wildlife alike.


Why Protect Redwoods Infographic

Think Big Today with this Redwoods Infographic

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Long before the environmental movement started, Save the Redwoods League began its work to protect redwood forests as part of the early conservation movement. But like most habitats around the world, the redwood forests continue to need our support. The coast redwoods and giant sequoias, the tallest and largest trees in the world, and the diverse plants and animals that inhabit their forests need all of us to be their voice.


Reese Næsborg and Cameron Williams of UC Berkeley climbing an old-growth Douglas fir. Photo by Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

New York Times Spotlights New League Research

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Redwoods are in the news this week, reminding the world once again that Earth’s tallest trees are truly ecosystems in their own right. Teeming with life from quite literally their roots to their highest leaves, the magnificent coast redwoods are home to hundreds of other species.


Stephen Mather, father of the National Parks Service and a founder of Save the Redwoods League. Photo courtesy Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

Charting a New Course in Step with the US Department of the Interior

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It’s National Park Week in the National Park System’s 100th anniversary year, so there’s no better time for Sally Jewell, US Secretary of the Interior, to inspire and challenge the nation, calling for a major course correction in the way we conserve America’s public lands, waters and wildlife.


Joaquin Miller Park. Photo by Lisse Lundin

Student Perspectives: 4 Reasons to Visit Joaquin Miller Park

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Although this park may be small in comparison to others, it is not lacking in variety of activities and scenery. From mountain biking to attending an outdoor play, this park has opportunities for people of all ages to enjoy, all while being removed from the bustle of the surrounding cities. Go to Joaquin Miller Park to discover the magic of the redwoods. Just minutes away from San Francisco and East Bay towns, you can take advantage of this local park any day of the week.


Infographic describes the benefits that redwoods provide for people and wildlife.

Infographic Shows How Redwoods Help People and Wildlife

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Did you know that the California Legislature named the coast redwood as California’s official state tree on April 3, 1937? In honor of our magnificent redwoods, we’ve created an infographic to show just some of the ways that redwoods support people and wildlife.