Projects

Creek restoration in Redwood National and State Parks. Photo by Mike Shoys

Proposition 64: California Adult Use of Marijuana Act

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The California Adult Use of Marijuana Act, or Proposition 64, was passed by voters in 2016. The measure legalized recreational marijuana in the state and thus created the world’s largest legal pot economy. The law includes funding for the restoration of forested watersheds and eventual stewardship of public lands most adversely impacted by illegal marijuana cultivation.

Add your voice to keep our beloved monuments intact, including the pictured Giant Sequoia National Monument. Photo by William Croft

Defending Our National Monuments

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NEWS: The Trump administration is now seeking public comments on draft resource management plans after drastically reducing Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. These draft plans do not protect the monuments’ irreplaceable values, and instead open them up to …

Photo by Belkin International, courtesy of California State Parks.

Digital Field Trips to Giant Sequoia

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Save the Redwoods League and California State Parks have collaborated to develop a new study unit focusing on the impacts and challenges facing giant sequoia. The innovative distance learning program, developed in honor of the League’s Centennial Year, will transport students around the world through virtual field trips to Calaveras Big Trees State Park, a nearly 6,500 acre preserve in the central Sierra that protects two spectacular groves of mighty old-growth giant sequoia.

The ancient redwood forest of Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve has remained largely untouched for thousands of years. Photo by Mike Shoys

Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve

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Nestled in the wooded hills along the Sonoma coast lies a hidden wonder that has remained largely untouched for thousands of years — 730 acres of pristine forest known as Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve.

Vote "Yes" on Prop 68 to help preserve the peace and beauty of the redwood forests for future generations to come. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Prop 68: The Clean Water and Safe Parks Act

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On June 5, 2018, voters will have the opportunity to pass Prop 68, authorizing $4.1 billion in bond funding for parks, natural resource protection, climate adaptation, water quality and supply, and flood protection. If approved by voters in June, the measure would enable the League to continue protecting and stewarding our beautiful redwood forests.

The pristine South Fork of the Tule River rushes through Red Hill Grove. Photo by Paolo Vescia.

Red Hill

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This forest was one of the world’s last unprotected giant sequoia properties. Red Hill is a spectacular property on the South Fork of the Tule River that supports more than 100 ancient giant sequoia and a mixed coniferous forest teeming with wildlife.

15-acre addition to the Grove of Old Trees park

The Grove of Old Trees

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Save the Redwoods League has expanded the Grove of Old Trees park to 48 acres by purchasing a neighboring 15-acre property and deeding it to LandPaths, the Grove’s owner and manager. Containing old-growth coast redwoods, oak woodland, grassland and a stretch of Coleman Valley Creek, this newly acquired property is a priority identified by the League’s Vibrant Forests Plan.

The Toumey Trail in Richardson Grove State Park crosses a corner of the Twin Trees forest. Photo by Mike Shoys

Twin Trees Forest

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A walk among the hushed stands of 300-foot-tall ancient giants in Richardson Grove State Park is a sensory journey back in time. Many of the trees are more than 1,000 years old, and among the world’s tallest. To protect this jewel of a park from potential threats on a neighboring property called Twin Trees, Save the Redwoods League recently purchased a conservation easement from land owner Lost Coast Forestlands.

Stewarts Point.

Stewarts Point Stewardship Project

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Nestled along the Sonoma County coast, the Stewarts Point Ranch property is blanketed with redwood and Douglas-fir forest, with a fringe of beautiful grasslands along its half-mile of coastline. Steelhead swim in the sparkling South Fork of the Gualala River, which runs the length of the eastern border.

Your gift will forever protect Westfall Ranch’s beautiful forest and meadows, a buffer for the Headwaters Forest Reserve, home of an ancient redwood forest.

Westfall Ranch

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Thanks to our donors’ generous gifts, Save the Redwoods League has forever protected the scenic 77-acre Westfall Ranch and buffered the famous Headwaters Forest Reserve just south of Eureka, California.

Shady Dell trail

Shady Dell

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For more than 100 years, this forest was a private, hidden treasure. Your generous gifts enabled Save the Redwoods League to buy the 957-acre Shady Dell and plan its restoration.

Sam Hodder, League President and CEO, explores the ancient redwoods at Big River-Mendocino Old-Growth Redwoods. Photo by Mike Shoys

Big River-Mendocino Old-Growth Redwoods

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Thousands of Save the Redwoods members like you pitched in to protect the Big River-Mendocino Old-Growth Redwoods from logging and development, allowing the League to purchase the property by the March deadline! Learn more.

You can protect and open Loma Mar Redwoods to the public. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Loma Mar Redwoods

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Thanks to donations from generous Save the Redwoods League members like you, a magical forest of big redwoods is ready for you to walk its wide, welcoming trails. Now part of San Mateo County’s Memorial Park (external link) and less than an …

You can help protect and restore this 33-acre ancient redwood forest, creating the opportunity for public access to Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest in the near future. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Santa Cruz Mountains Old-Growth Campaign

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Thanks to donations from generous members like you, Save the Redwoods League met matching gift challenges and raised the funds needed by December 31, 2014, to protect the breathtaking Peters Creek Old-Growth Forest and Boulder Creek Forest.

Bennett Juniper Tree and bench looking over mountain vista

Bennett Juniper Stewardship Project

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This extraordinary tree was under Save the Redwoods’ protection in California’s Stanislaus National Forest until 2022, when this land was transferred to the Mother Lode Land Trust for long-term stewardship. Before then, rancher JW Martin Sr. protected the tree until donating it and the surrounding three acres in 1978 to The Nature Conservancy. The Nature Conservancy conveyed it and the surrounding buffering land to the League in 1987.

Your gifts helped to repair a collapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the Skunk Train's famous Redwood Route to the Noyo River Redwoods, which you protected. Smiles have returned to riders' faces, as in this 2011 image. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Noyo River Redwoods

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In 2011, you helped us buy Noyo River Redwoods, a magical ancient forest you can see only by the historic Skunk Train. Recently you came to the rescue again. Your gifts helped to repair acollapsed railroad tunnel that shut down the train’s famous Redwood Route last April. Full train service—from Willits to Northspur and from Fort Bragg to Northspur—has been restored.

Cape Vizcaino

Cape Vizcaino Restoration

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Since purchasing the 401-acre property Cape Vizcaino property in 2008, Save the Redwoods League has been helping this Mendocino County landscape recover from decades of logging and ranching.

Your support will allow students to reach and learn about these amazing giant sequoias. Photo by Bob Wick

Craig Ranch Project

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Introducing a Mountain Treasure Southeast of Three Rivers in the Sierra Nevada is a kingdom of giant sequoias reachable on foot, mountain bike and horseback. Ancient giants here measure as much as 16 feet across, likely wider than your dining room. Springs flow …

Our recent purchase of land helps protect the surrounding Giant Sequoia National Monument (pictured), home of some of the Earth's largest trees.

Giant Sequoias Protected

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You helped protect an important parcel of giant sequoia forestland that was recently transferred to the US Forest Service. Your support helped save this property from development, protecting a critical water source for wildlife and the forest, homes for animals and the amazing trees in the surrounding Giant Sequoia National Monument.

Calaveras Big Trees State Park. Photo by Julie Martin

Calaveras Big Trees State Park Visitor Center

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As the story goes, in 1852 a hunter wounded a grizzly and chased it into a forest, only to find trees that were three times bigger than any he’d ever seen before. When he returned to civilization, the hunter spread …