Skip to main content

students

Student observes the sword fern leaves

Students Find Connections with Nature

on

This spring, hundreds of high school students from around the San Francisco Bay Area and Humboldt County explored coast redwood forests as scientists through the Redwood Education Programs offered by Save the Redwoods League. Students ventured out of the classroom and into the forest to connect to the natural world and learn about climate change and scientific field techniques.

...Continued
Fresh Air music video by Sergio Herrera and Jose Hernandez

Redwood Education Grants Program

on

One of our grantees, the Humboldt County Office of Education, worked with students this year from Fortuna High School’s videography class to create “art” in the redwoods after learning about redwood ecology.

...Continued
The redwood forest inspires the students in our Redwoods and Climate Change High School Program.

National Poetry Month Inspires Student Haikus

on

During our redwood field trips with students, Save the Redwoods League tries to appeal to all the different ways redwood trees elicit inspiration for youth. The following haikus were written by students in our Redwoods and Climate Change High School Program.

...Continued
High school students get hands-on experience studying climate change in the redwood forest at Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve.

High School Students as Citizen Scientists

on

If you ask high school students what the impacts of climate change have been, they can tell you that the polar ice caps are melting, that we have extreme weather, and that California has been in a drought for the past few years. But if you ask them how climate change will affect our forests and the plants and animals that live in them, they find it harder to come up with an answer.

...Continued

Unstructured Nature Time for Oakland Students

on

When children have unstructured play time in nature, they are better observers, they ask questions, and they become more comfortable with their surroundings. Despite its benefits, all too often, unstructured play time is limited for kids today, especially in the outdoors.

...Continued

Life Hack: Fun Hiking Game for Kids

on

Hiking with kids can sometimes feel like a forced march, we’ve all experienced kids complaining about walking for walking’s sake. Obviously, the best remedy for reluctant young hikers is regular doses of candy, but the next best remedy is also super fun and does not contribute to cavities! This is a nature color game that is a trade secret of environmental educators and is really easy to play.

...Continued
Students conduct scientific investigations of redwood trees as well as explore the forest in Little Basin.

How Best to Help Kids Learn About Nature?

on

Environmental educators are always juggling what, how much and how long to teach students in nature. Do you let students explore and observe a forest on their own, or do you give them more structured activities? Do you introduce sophisticated Continued

Deborah Zierten worked with junior high students from San Francisco to document species at Muir Woods during BioBlitz. Photo credit: Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

BioBlitzing with students!

on

On March 28th, over 4,000 visitors and volunteer scientists arrived at Muir Woods National Monument ready to learn, discover, and explore this absolutely amazing redwood forest. Thousands more visited the Crissy Field Center for the Biodiversity Festival. Whether or not Continued

Marin high school students use their cell phones to participate in Redwood Watch, our citizen science program.

Using Cell Phones for Science

on

These days, I think it’s a pretty safe bet that many people spend more time on their cell phones — checking email, posting to Facebook, playing games— than they do out in nature. This trend seems especially prevalent among our Continued

Join our newsletter
Get the latest redwood updates in your inbox
   Please leave this field empty
Top