Skip to main content

Author Archives: Richard Campbell

Deliberate burning as a restoration tool. Images by Leonel Arguello, National Park Service

Burning as a Restoration Tool

on

Last week, the sky around the Bald Hills area of Redwood National Park was hazy beyond the normal shroud of fog.  Smoke filled the air.  The forest was burning.  Water trucks stood at the ready, fire crews and park staff … Continued

How Tall is Your Tree?

on

Ever wondered how big that tree in your backyard is?  There are many ways to measure the heights of trees, but most of them unfortunately require lots of time, money, and specialized equipment.  There is one method, however, that needs … Continued

Big Win in Court for a Small Endangered Bird

on

Marbled murrelets haven’t had an easy century.  With their oceanic feeding grounds impacted by commercial fishing and the occasional oil spill, and their ancient forest nesting grounds mostly lost to the axe and the saw, these shy creatures have had … Continued

A Redwood of a Blog: How the Giant Trees Grow

on

RCCI’s nursery experiments and tree ring analyses are essential to understanding the past and future of the redwood forest, but it is the trees themselves that tell us about its present. By establishing 16 large plots in old-growth forests throughout … Continued

Dendrochronology: The Glue that Binds RCCI

on

The first phase of the Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative was based upon understanding how past climate has affected the ancient redwood and giant sequoia forests.  To do this, the research teams relied upon the science of dendrochronology: the analysis of … Continued

Photo courtesy Save the Redwoods League

Revving Up Research

on

Each year, we at the League are fortunate to be able to help shape and develop new knowledge about the redwood forest.  Through our research grants program, we sponsor several teams of scientists who are working to answer a wide … Continued

Ancient Forest Discovered – Underwater!

on

Depending on whom you believe, the ancient and legendary city of Atlantis was forever lost beneath the waves after a volcano, war, or dust-up between the gods, and its disappearance gave rise to centuries of speculation, storytelling, and exploration.  If … Continued

What Makes a Blue Bird Blue?

on

In the gray-green dim of the redwood forest, a flash of blue ignites the dusky understory.  A Steller’s jay alights upon a tanoak limb, chattering madly.  The brightness of its feathers seems incongruous with the dark of the forest, a … Continued

Fire Season

on

Along with spring, summer, autumn and winter, California has a fifth season – fire season.  After a couple of dry winters, the current fire season in California is predicted to be one of the most intense on record.  Habitats from … Continued

Share and Share Alike

on

In an early version of a now-famous passage, John Muir wrote, “When we try to pick out anything by itself we find that it is bound fast by a thousand invisible cords that cannot be broken, to everything in the … Continued

Building a City of Knowledge

on

Sometimes when I tell people about new research the League has sponsored, like this recent study describing the links between forest condition and salamander populations in recovering redwood forests, I get a look that I know means, “That’s pretty neat, but … Continued

In vitro culture of Aulacomnium turgidum regenerated from emergent Little Ice Age population beneath the Tear Drop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. Credit: Image courtesy of Catherine La Farge

The Toughest Plants in the World

on

It’s not often that I hear about a creature more resilient than redwoods.  After all, they grow faster, live longer, and reproduce more prolifically than just about any other tree.  Be that as it may, some very small, unassuming creatures … Continued

Join our newsletter
Get the latest redwood updates in your inbox
   Please leave this field empty
Top