Skip to main content
Go to the Homepage
Portola Redwoods State Park.
Portola Redwoods State Park.

Crisis is turning into opportunity for our state park system.  California State Parks has  new, effective leadership in Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (retired).  And the State’s Little Hoover Commission just issued its thoughtful report, identifying many of the actions needed to restore our park system to its former stature.

Our predecessors handed us a legacy; now it is our turn.  There should be a general fund-based, long-term funding commitment to operate, maintain and improve the parks; our parks are the obligation of everyone in this State, not just those who visit a park.  In addition, new sources of revenue are needed; the old revenue model will not work in the future.

Finally, we must build on the many partnerships between State Parks and other agencies and nonprofits to create more effective operating models.  The League, in collaboration with State Parks staff and local nonprofit partners, is helping to find new ways to improve and operate some redwood parks.  Other nonprofit organizations, working with State Park staff, are helping to achieve similar success in other parks.

We can do this.  We are a wealthy state – wealthy in natural, human and economic resources.  We care deeply about the environment.  We love to walk in the redwoods, hike in the mountains, fish in the rivers and swim at the beaches.

Our children are watching us.  Will we squander our heritage or pass it on to them in better condition than when we received it?  We at Save the Redwoods League are rolling up our sleeves to pitch in. To learn more about the report and the League’s involvement with state parks, visit our Support State Parks page.

Please join us. Donate to our Park Crisis Fund to directly support threatened redwood parks.


Tags: , , , , ,


About Harry Pollack

Harry joined Save the Redwoods League’s staff in 2011 as the General Counsel. He brings over 30 years of experience in the fields of law and real estate transactions.


Share this Article


Trillium is toxic!

Have you ever seen this stunning flower in the redwood forest? It is a Giant Wake Robin, or Trillium chloropetalum, and was recently seen blooming in the Santa Cruz Mountains by our staff and our colleagues from POST. The petals … Continued


Giant sequoia cones. Photo by Mark Bult Finding Patterns in the Redwoods: It’s Easy as 1, 1, 2, 3…

Nature’s patterns are everywhere.  Sometimes they’re obvious – we mammals, for instance, almost always have five fingers and five toes on each hand and foot.  Sometimes these patterns aren’t nearly so apparent, but they’re still there nonetheless. The Fibonacci sequence … Continued


Leave a Reply