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The League’s cooperative approach, in which active forests are managed alongside parks and reserves, allows for the permanent protection of more old-growth redwoods and wildlife habitat than would be possible otherwise.

The League currently manages this 871-acre parcel at Stewarts Point as a working model of forest stewardship.
The League currently manages this 871-acre parcel at Stewarts Point as a working model of forest stewardship.

Since 1918, Save the Redwoods League has worked to purchase and protect redwood forest lands, and thanks to your support we have protected nearly 200,000 acres and helped develop dozens of redwood parks and reserves. These lands have all been impacted by human activity such as unsustainable logging. Careful restoration and ongoing stewardship are crucial to help these places provide clean water for people and wildlife, homes for imperiled animals and plants, as well as recreation and awe-inspiring scenery.

The League and our partners manage and steward private and public land by giving it the holistic care it needs to thrive. This can include activities such as conducting biological surveys and other environmental monitoring, building or removing infrastructure like trails and bridges, and restoration to help the land recover from past damage. Ensuring public access is often a good stewardship practice, too—the more people who can visit redwood forests, the more people who care about protecting them.

We support a comprehensive vision of forest conservation that includes active forests as well as protected parks and lands. Active redwood forests, when managed responsibly with a science-based approach, provide needed wood products and economic benefits while maintaining or improving the forest’s health. This model ensures the long-term economic viability of the forest, preventing it from being developed or converted for other uses. Meanwhile, old-growth stands and wildlife habitats are preserved.

Our protection for redwood forests is unwavering, and our vision for the future of the redwoods is one in which the entire redwood forest ecosystem — public and private lands alike — will continue to thrive and adapt to change. As our forests are increasingly threatened by unsustainable logging, development and climate change, it is essential for conservationists and foresters to work together. This cooperative approach, in which active forests are managed alongside parks and reserves, allows for the permanent protection of more old-growth redwoods and wildlife habitat than would be possible otherwise.

Help us save more redwood forests. You can make your gift in memory or honor of an individual or organization.


Learn about the League’s Stewardship Projects

Stewarts Point

Learn about the fascinating historic town owned and stewarded by the League.

 

Twin Trees Forest

Learn more about how this property is an important buffer to Richardson Grove State Park.

 

Bennett Juniper

Learn about the Bennett Juniper stewardship project and get directions to visit this amazing tree.