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Old-growth redwoods endure beside logged stands in Redwood National and State Parks. Photo by Mike Shoys

Redwoods as Catalysts for Change

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Save the Redwoods League sat down recently with Jonathan Jarvis, former National Park Service Director, to discuss the redwood forest and its next 100 years, as well as his new book, The Future of Conservation in America—A Chart for Rough Water.

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Pristine unnamed creeks run through Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve.

Hidden Ancient Haven Saved

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Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve will become the first ancient redwood park created in a generation. For decades, the privately owned reserve was a natural wonder containing 352 acres of old-growth redwoods unknown to the public.

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Felicia Marcus. Photo credit: California Water Resources Control Board

Felicia Marcus Promotes Protecting the Forest to Save Water

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California’s Water Resources Control Board has a broad purview, overseeing water rights, regulating groundwater, and maintaining and enforcing standards for drinking water. And that’s just what they do as a critical partner with Save the Redwoods League in forest lands management and watershed restoration efforts.

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T. A. Barron. Photo by Aimee Giese

T. A. Barron Writes of Wonder in the Redwoods

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T. A. Barron, a Councilor for Save the Redwoods League, grew up in rural Colorado, where his connection to nature was immersive and powerful. The lofty peaks, pristine streams, and expansive aspen and spruce forests of the Rocky Mountains constituted … Continued

The Obama family at Yosemite National Park, Father's Day 2016. From left are Sasha, Barack, Michelle, and Malia. White House photo.

President Obama’s Conservation Legacy

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From protecting more land and water than any other president, to motivating our nation to act on climate, to opening every national park to kids and their families for free, President Obama earned a place in history as an accomplished conservation champion.

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Justin Faggioli is Save the Redwoods League Board of Directors Secretary.

Justin Faggioli: Developing Strategies for a Leafy Future

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After college earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth sciences at Stanford University, Justin Faggioli spent three years working as a geologist, primarily on projects in Alaska. His job took him to some of the most remote areas of the state, most of the time in a helicopter. In addition to the geologic work, Justin was able to enjoy the beautiful flora, amazing fauna and spectacular scenery.

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John and Cyndi Wollams

John Woollam: Champion of American Landscapes

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A research physicist by training, Save the Redwoods League member John Woollam has made his mark as both an educator and entrepreneur. Woollam is the recipient of the American Physical Society’s Industrial Applications of Physics Prize, and a National Research Council Fellow. But physics aren’t Woollam’s sole passion; he is an ardent conservationist with a far-ranging ambit. He has supported large preservation and restoration projects in the Caribbean, and worked with numerous different land trusts in the Midwest.

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Debbie Woollett: Putting a Dog’s Nose to Work for the Forest

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One of biologist Debbie Woollett’s star colleagues has four legs. Wicket is a Labrador mix for Working Dogs for Conservation, an organization that Woollett co-founded to apply dogs’ abilities to conservation projects. Wicket can recognize the scents of 26 species and has “alerted” on moon bears in China, elephants in Southeast Asia, invasive snails in Hawaii, and grizzly bears and black bears in North America.

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League Councillor Blake Williams shares his enthusiasm for the redwoods with his child. Photo by Paolo Vescia

Blake Williams: Love for Forest Stems from Father’s Work

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Blake Williams inherited his love of the forest from his father, a research entomologist and forester and the first African American in the United States to earn the trifecta of a BA, Masters, and PhD in that research area. “Growing up in Berkeley with that family background, I’ve always been interested in natural resources and forests,” said Williams.

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Susan Vreeland named the League in her will. Photo by Kip Gray

Susan Vreeland: Author Ensures Enduring Support for Redwoods

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Susan Vreeland believes everyone needs some engagement with Earth’s astonishing natural places. That’s why she has named Save the Redwoods League in her will. “Save the Redwoods acknowledges this human need, for the sake of our national health, our emotional health,” she said. “Preserving more redwood groves provides an atmosphere to heal, to consider one’s life, to confront the eternal.”

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