wildlife

condor release

Time to spy a rare bird in the sky

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Next time you visit Redwood National and State Parks, you may see magnificent creatures that have been absent from this area for more than a century: California condors. The Yurok Tribe and Redwood National Park released the first two young …

A woman stands at the base of a large coast redwood tree

A guide to nature journaling

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To be a naturalist or an artist—or of course both, like Clay Anderson—requires paying attention; to the world around you and how you respond to it. Nature journaling is one of the ways you can do that.

Man standing next to a giant redwood tree

Mailliard Ranch: Nearly 15,000 Acres Protected

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Home to the largest coast redwood forest still in private family hands, Mailliard Ranch is a 14,838-acre property near Boonville, California, in southern Mendocino County. In February 2021, Save the Redwoods League permanently protected this landscape with three conservation easements, closing the final phase of the project.

Threatened and endangered wildlife in the redwoods

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As controversy erupted in recent months over the protected status of the northern spotted owl in the Pacific Northwest, it was another reminder that California’s coast redwood and giant sequoia forests play host to many threatened and endangered wildlife species. …

A view of a reservoir surrounded by forested mountains and a blue sky, framed by branches of an oak tree, with an owl flying through.

Reflections on nature during our pandemic year

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Spotting a barn owl in the wild, League President and CEO Sam Hodder reflects on the role nature has played in inspiring and sustaining people during a global pandemic.

Bear at Red Hill

Bears at Red Hill

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Our cameras at our Red Hill property captured these great images of California black bears.

Pacific fisher at Red Hill

More Pacific fishers at Red Hill

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We’re excited to see Pacific fishers again at our Red Hill giant sequoia property in the Sierra.

A pair of marbled murrelets, small birds with black and white feathers, float together on the ocean.

A seabird that lives in the redwoods?

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Of all the plants and animals that occupy the coast redwood ecosystem, among the more fascinating is the marbled murrelet, a brown and white seabird that’s a little bigger than a robin. This otherwise nondescript bird – called “fog larks” …

Mountain lion at Red Hill

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As we monitor and research the habitat at Red Hill to determine future conservation strategies, we find some really cool stuff on our trail cameras. For instance, these shots of a mountain lion captured just a few days ago. Big thanks to our wildlife biologist friends at Colibiri Consulting for catching this moment on camera.

Pacific fisher

Spotted: The Elusive Pacific Fisher at Red Hill

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These nocturnal critters are mid-sized carnivores in the weasel family. Females have home ranges up to 10 square miles, and males have even larger home ranges since they mate with multiple females.

California red-legged frog

New Study Shows Habitat Corridors Increase Biodiversity

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Imagine this: There’s an amazing neighborhood farmers’ market that’s a safe and easy walk from your house. You shop for fresh local produce there every week, until one day, the market is relocated to a spot that’s just out of reasonable walking distance. To top it off, there’s now a six-lane freeway that you’d have to cross to get to it. Your habitat has just been fragmented.

Mountain lion

Redwoods Rising apprentice shares tale of mountain lion encounter

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As I was heading toward the gap in the logs, I noticed that the one to my right had a large dark area under it. I didn’t think it was anything because most of the time it’s either charred or shaded making it look darker than it really is.

The red-bellied newt (Taricha rivularis)

Newts: Charismatic Creatures of the Redwood Forest

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If you decide to venture into the redwoods on a rainy day, you may be rewarded with the pleasure of crossing paths with one of the redwood forest’s most charismatic creatures – newts! There are three species of newts that can be found in the coast redwood forest, and they love to make an appearance during wet weather.

Wildlife Wonders: Cameras Find Forests Teeming with Life

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The League’s wildlife cams at Cape Vizcaino (Cape Viz) in Mendocino County caught animals in action playing, prancing, grazing, and generally doing what animals do. The property provides habitat to a variety of wildlife including (but certainly not limited to) American black bears, ospreys, black tailed deer, and pumas living among stands of old-growth coast redwoods, grasslands, chaparral, and a scenic, rugged coastline.

Discovering Wildlife at Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve

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This summer, the League protected Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve, the largest old-growth redwood forest remaining in private lands. Many wild animals call the property home, including northern spotted owls, Townsend’s big-eared bats, foothill yellow-legged frogs, and Sonoma red tree voles!

Marbled murrelet is listed as "Endangered." Photo by Tim Lenz, Flickr Creative Commons

The Endangered Species Act

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The Endangered Species Act was signed into law in 1973, and is a bedrock statute in land protection and conservation. The intention of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to prevent wildlife species extinction, help imperiled species recover, and support …

Marbled murrelet is listed as "Endangered." Photo by Tim Lenz, Flickr Creative Commons

The Endangered Species Act is Endangered

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The Department of the Interior is working to revise regulatory language in the ESA. The alarming proposal would allow for the analysis of economic impacts when considering listing species or considering protections — a reversal of the current statute.

New Protections for the Mysterious Marbled Murrelet

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In February, Oregon’s Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to reclassify the marbled murrelet from threatened to endangered. The vote is good news, considering that murrelets have lost an estimated 78,600 acres of nesting habitat in Oregon since 1993. By some models cited by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the species risks an 80 percent chance of extinction by 2060 in certain parts of the state.