Author Archives: Garrison Frost

Garrison FrostGarrison Frost joined Save the Redwoods League in 2019 as its Director of Communications.

A female California State Parks naturalist interpreter in park ranger fatigues gives her presentation before a tablet on a tripod on which she is livestreaming a virtual program to Facebook.

Bringing redwoods to the people

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The pandemic presented both a daunting challenge and the opportunity to take a flying leap toward an idea that had long been in the making. Since early March, the North Coast Redwoods District’s interpretation team has been delivering five to 10 PORTS programs each week, as well as daily Facebook live programs to the general public.  During this period, more than 5,000 students have received coast redwood-related PORTS programs, and their Facebook Live presentations have been viewed over 250,000 times. As to how his team came to the decision to hold daily events in the middle of a national crisis, Robbins deadpanned: “We just decided to do it.”

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A pair of marbled murrelets, small birds with black and white feathers, float together on the ocean.

A seabird that lives in the redwoods?

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Of all the plants and animals that occupy the coast redwood ecosystem, among the more fascinating is the marbled murrelet, a brown and white seabird that’s a little bigger than a robin. This otherwise nondescript bird – called “fog larks” Continued

A wide visitors trail in Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Photo by Peter C. Buranzon.

Tips for summer travel to the redwoods

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Every summer, millions of people from around the world descend on California’s redwood country, the central and northern coast redwood forests, as well as the giant sequoia groves in the Sierra. But with the continuing COVID-19 crisis, summer 2020 is shaping up to be a travel season like no other before it.

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Redwoods Rising collaborators at kick-off event.

Forests of Opportunity

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With the public launch of our Forest Forest Campaign, the League scales up our pace, reach, and impact.

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General Sherman Tree. Photograph by Bill Fletcher

Defiant Redwood of the Week: General Sherman Tree

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The General Sherman Tree is about 2,000 years old and is a giant among giants. Considered the world’s largest tree, measured by volume, it stands 275 feet tall. In a world full of threats and challenges, it has planted its roots and set its defenses. It is strong and ready.

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Dawn Redwood, photo by J.G. in SF

10 nerdy cool things about redwoods

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Help connect kids to redwoods from afar by teaching them fun redwood forest facts – starting with these 10 neat facts you may not know about the redwoods.

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Lupine is a wildflower found in redwood forests. Photo by Max Forster.

Wildflowers of the redwood forests

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If it’s spring, it’s wildflower season. Wildflower season is one of the best times to experiences California’s great outdoors. While we can’t get out there to see them ourselves, we thought it would be nice to recall some of our favorites that pop up under the tall trees.

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Grizzly Giant is the definition of being tough through hard times. It's message is bend, don't break. Be #RedwoodStrong.

Defiant Redwood of the Week: Grizzly Giant

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This is a serious tree. If a tree could talk, the eternal message from this 210-foot-tall giant sequoia in Yosemite’s Mariposa Grove would be Bring It On. At roughly 3,000 years old and 1,500 tons, it is the very definition Continued

A Marvelous Journey through Cascade Creek

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This is the kind of place you protect, not just because it is incredibly beautiful, but because it makes the natural world in every direction all that much better.

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Young visitor looking at tree rings

How old are these redwoods, really?

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It’s the question that usually comes right after the one about height: “How old do you think this redwood is?”
And in many ways, the answer to this second question can be even more stunning than the first.

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Two bright red snowflowers on the forest floor.

The bloody flesh-like thing

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This strange little thing is called a snowflower or snow plant, and it is found fairly commonly in giant sequoia forests and other coniferous montane areas of California, Oregon, and Nevada. These common names are far friendlier than its scientific name, Sarcodes sanguinea, which translates roughly to “bloody flesh-like thing," in reference to the bright red color of the entire plant.

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