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Student Perspectives: Have You Taken Advantage of Nature Yet?

Student Perspectives: This blog series was written by San Francisco State University students for the Recreational Use of Parks and Protected Areas course taught by Dr. Nina Roberts in Fall 2015. The goal of Dr. Roberts’ blog assignment was to show how student support of redwood parks can create new ways to foster equal access to nature by diverse communities. For this assignment, each student visited a local redwood park and wrote about their experience. Enjoy!


Have You Taken Advantage of Nature Yet?

by Janell Banday

Janell Banday admires the redwoods at Joaquin Miller Park. This park offers multiple redwood groves, many trails, and a distant view of the Bay Bridge.
Janell Banday admires the redwoods at Joaquin Miller Park. This park offers multiple redwood groves, many trails, and a distant view of the Bay Bridge.

According to The Outdoor Foundation, just under half (49.2 percent) of Americans participated in an outdoor recreational activity in 2013. If you have not visited a national, local or state park lately, you are missing out on a great way to engage in outdoor recreation. Visiting parks not only supports a healthier lifestyle, but also opportunities to learn.

Although many people take advantage of parks already, participation is uneven and we strive for everyone to visit parks and feel welcomed. In general, people who identify as “Caucasian/White, non-Hispanic” report having the highest participation in outdoor activities, and we want to be sure everyone gets involved. By making sure minorities also have access and knowledge of parks, we can all move toward healthier bodies and minds.

Visiting local redwoods forests is a great start to being actively involved with parks. Many redwood forests offer access to numerous trails for you to hike, bike, run, eat, and play! Many parks even plan regular events for the public to enjoy, bringing fun to all.

After moving up the coast of California, I realized how amazing California’s coastal redwoods are. These trees can live for more than 2,000 years and rank as the world’s tallest tree, measuring up to 379 feet tall. Redwoods are beautifully captivating and hiking through them is such a treat, but do not just take my word for it, go visit a redwood grove today!

Find a park near you.


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Student Perspectives

We appreciate being able to contribute our experiences and our knowledge to the Save the Redwoods League community through these blog entries and hope that our work can support your cause and our communities.



Berkeley High students learning about redwood ecology.

Student Perspectives: From Student to Teacher at Redwood Regional Park

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One of my favorite places on Earth is Muir Woods, so when it was announced that we would be going to Redwood Regional Park as part of a fieldtrip for my UC Berkeley/Save the Redwoods League joint internship, I was insanely excited.


Experience the Redwoods from Afar in ‘Close Encounters’

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Reading the perspective of someone who has never seen a redwood forest, I got to vicariously experience the redwoods for the first time again. I wanted to share “Close Encounters with Coastal Giants” with you, so that you can enjoy it, too.


2 Responses to “Student Perspectives: Have You Taken Advantage of Nature Yet?”

  1. jack paxton

    Does this give you a clue as to why, Janell “The Outdoor Foundation, just under half (49.2 percent) of Americans participated in an outdoor recreational activity in 2013. If you have not visited a national, local or state park lately, you are missing out on a great way to engage in outdoor recreation.”?
    NYT: today: Should Overcrowded National Parks Have Restricted Access?
    Tourism is degrading popular natural sites with increased crowds, pollution and conflicts between humans and wildlife.
    Too many people!!!!!

    Reply
    • Save the Redwoods League

      Thanks for the comment! You bring up an interesting issue. While some popular national parks experience crowds, many great parks are underutilized – from national parks like Redwood National Park, which has the capacity for more visitors than it typically receives, to state and local parks. We are fortunate to have so many wonderful parks with lots of recreational opportunities that there is room for everyone in our parks and public lands. In order to avoid overwhelming any one particular park, the League recommends exploring one of the many less-frequented but still amazingly beautiful parks! If you would like specific recommendations, just let us know. Thanks again for your concern for these natural treasures!

      Reply

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