science

Researchers measure redwoods in experiments that are part of our effort to protect forests during rapid climate change. Photo by Anthony Ambrose

Redwoods and Climate Change Update

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Today, redwoods stand at a new crossroads of environmental change where rapid climatic changes and other factors threaten them in ways they have not experienced before in their long history on Earth. Our Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative research project will help us understand redwoods’ vulnerabilities to climatic changes so we can protect these forests in the future. Now Initiative scientists are studying 450 redwood saplings.

Emily Limm found that western sword fern absorbed the most moisture from fog. Photo by Emily Burns

Symposium Showcases Redwoods Research

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Your support helps Save the Redwoods League study redwood forests and their surrounding land and waterways to understand how to best protect these resources. Research also helps us learn what the forest’s survival means to the health of people and our planet. Now you can read details of the League-sponsored science symposium, The Coast Redwood Forests in a Changing California. Highlights include the keynote speech on conservation by Ruskin K. Hartley, former Executive Director of Save the Redwoods League, and a paper on how plants absorb fog by Emily Burns, former Director of Science.

Humboldt Marten.

Your Support Nets Discoveries about Forest

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Did you know that redwoods are not only highly resistant to fire but are nearly indestructible? Just one year after devastating fires, redwoods that had been scorched were already covered with the green fuzz of new foliage. Are you aware that installing rest boxes (like birdhouses) on trees can help save members of the weasel family known as martens? These agile creatures are redwood forest dwellers that have nearly vanished.

Researchers of the Save the Redwoods League Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative study redwoods to determine how climate change will affect their future. Photo by Stephen C. Sillett

Wells Fargo Supports Our Redwoods Research

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Stephanie Rico feels fortunate to live among the redwoods in the San Francisco Bay Area. One of her favorite things is standing in a circle of redwood trees at a nearby park with her son. “I look up and feel humbled,” said the Wells Fargo Vice President of Environmental Affairs. Troubled by how climate change will affect our lives, Rico wants to motivate more people to work toward solutions. Learn more about Wells Fargo’s support of the redwoods.

Experts Share Latest on Redwoods, Climate Change

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The weight of salamanders in the redwood ecosystem is greater than that of all other vertebrates collectively because there are so many of the amphibians! Predicted drier forest conditions may threaten amphibian species, said David Wake, Professor of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Wake and other scientists discussed the impact of climate change on redwood ecosystems at a recent Save the Redwoods League-sponsored symposium.