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The Inspiring Response to Free Redwood Parks Day

Group after smiling group rolled into Samuel P. Taylor State Park on November 27 for the first Free Redwood Parks Day sponsored by Save the Redwoods League, all of them happy to be in the forest’s embrace instead of fighting mall crowds on Black Friday. Their enthusiasm was uplifting and gratifying. To see so many people interested in the forest and nature gave me hope for the planet.

I had a great time meeting so many groups of visitors! Deanna and Tana, for example, were first through the gate. Skies were clear, and although it was a brisk 32 degrees, the smiles of the two women from Oakland were warm. They said Free Redwood Parks Day motivated them to visit Samuel P. Taylor’s giant redwoods for the first time. So off they went into the lush wet forest.

Jim Espinas and his group of 16 friends and family members made the trip from the East San Francisco Bay Area because he heard about the free admission and thought it was a good idea to visit the park. His group said they had a great time. Their kids saw the forest from high and low — while riding on the adults’ shoulders and playing beside massive redwoods.

Elaine Kociolek and her family traveled from Benicia. “It’s a wonderful way to spend the day after Thanksgiving — much better than going to the mall,” she said.

Jon and Brigitte Popenoe of San Raphael were eager to ride their bicycles on the Cross Marin Trail.

They said they didn’t want to stay inside on Black Friday.

Megan Micco and her family felt the same way. “I wanted to be in a park today,” said the Berkeley resident.

All these groups were so thankful for the day among the redwoods.

Reactions like these are what inspire me to continue my work at the League to bring people to the redwood forest so they will know, love and protect it. So if you enjoyed the redwood forest on free redwood parks day, thank you. If you shared photos with the tags #OptOutside and #IntoTheRedwoods, thank you again! See your photos here.

Keep visiting redwood parks and bring your friends and family – you can plan your trip with our Redwoods Finder Interactive Map.


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About Jennifer Charney

As Communications Manager, Jennifer has produced the Save the Redwoods League magazine, newsletters, annual report, calendar and other publications since she joined the organization in 2007. She brings a lifelong love of nature to her role.



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