High school students get hands-on experience studying climate change in the redwood forest at Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve.

An Earth Day for Science

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This year’s Earth Day theme is focused on environmental and climate literacy, which means that we need to make sure everyone is educated on the impacts of climate change on our planet and the actions we can take to protect and sustain our environment.

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NEW Educational Materials Now Available

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We are excited to unveil our new coast redwood and giant sequoia educational brochures, “Life in the Coast Redwoods” and “Our Giant Sequoia Forests.” Save the Redwoods League has been working hard on these educational resources and are eager to share them with you.

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High school students get hands-on experience studying climate change in the redwood forest at Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve.

High School Students as Citizen Scientists

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If you ask high school students what the impacts of climate change have been, they can tell you that the polar ice caps are melting, that we have extreme weather, and that California has been in a drought for the past few years. But if you ask them how climate change will affect our forests and the plants and animals that live in them, they find it harder to come up with an answer.

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Unstructured Nature Time for Oakland Students

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When children have unstructured play time in nature, they are better observers, they ask questions, and they become more comfortable with their surroundings. Despite its benefits, all too often, unstructured play time is limited for kids today, especially in the outdoors.

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Children's Books about Redwoods

Happy Book Lovers Day!

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This week we celebrate our love of books and our love of reading! Some of my fondest memories have been relaxing in a beautiful place with a great book and getting so engulfed in the story that hours went by in the blink of an eye.

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Orick Mill

Drone’s-Eye View of the Orick Mill Site

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When you drive north on Highway 101, just past the small town of Orick, you will begin to marvel at the giant redwoods of Redwood National and State Parks. There is no sign letting you know you have arrived; you just slowly become shaded by the great canopies towering above you.

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Lichen

Lichens in the News

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You cannot spend time in a redwood forest without coming across lichen. Only a few lichen species will catch your eye on the bark of a redwood but up in the canopy and on the forest floor an abundance of these organisms will surround you. A few years ago we conducted canopy research at Muir Woods looking at lichen diversity at the tops of the trees. We also now have a state lichen. But recent research on lichen sheds a new light on what this organism is all about.

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Coffin tree. Photo by Brian Chlu, Flickr Creative Commons

Coffin Tree, a Redwood Relative in Taiwan

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This week we bring you the coffin tree (Taiwania cryptomeriodes) or Taiwan cedar, one of the largest trees in Asia. This tree is found in forests in mainland China and Taiwan growing alongside plants not unlike those found in our coast redwood forests.

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Alerce. Photo by andrea ugarte, Flickr Creative Commons

Redwood Relatives South of the Equator

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The beautiful Alerce trees, Fitzroya cupressoides, grow in the cool rainforests of Chile, just to the west of the Andes. The Alerce are members of the same conifer family as the redwoods (the Cupressaceae) and the two species share many striking similarities.

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This detailed drawing by Robert Van Pelt shows that widely-spaced, large redwood trees maintain deep crowns full of leaves while also providing room on the forest floor for smaller trees and understory vegetation to thrive. This forest structure results in record-breaking forest productivity and carbon storage.

Ancient Coast Redwood Forest Breaks Records

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New research by Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative scientists Robert Van Pelt and colleagues reveals no forest on Earth has more biomass – wood, bark, and leaves – then the ancient coast redwood forests of Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP).

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Sequoia National Park.

Leaf to Landscape Project

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After the fourth consecutive year of severe drought in California, a team of scientists came together in the summer of 2015 to study the impacts of the historic drought on the world’s largest trees, the giant sequoias.

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Why Protect Redwoods Infographic

Think Big Today with this Redwoods Infographic

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Long before the environmental movement started, Save the Redwoods League began its work to protect redwood forests as part of the early conservation movement. But like most habitats around the world, the redwood forests continue to need our support. The coast redwoods and giant sequoias, the tallest and largest trees in the world, and the diverse plants and animals that inhabit their forests need all of us to be their voice.

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Reese Næsborg and Cameron Williams of UC Berkeley climbing an old-growth Douglas fir. Photo by Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

New York Times Spotlights New League Research

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Redwoods are in the news this week, reminding the world once again that Earth’s tallest trees are truly ecosystems in their own right. Teeming with life from quite literally their roots to their highest leaves, the magnificent coast redwoods are home to hundreds of other species.

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Redwoods Education Reaches Across Language Barriers

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As I prepared to teach my first Redwoods and Climate Change lesson in the classroom, I was admittedly nervous. This class was composed entirely of English language learners. As the students shuffled into the classroom, took their seats and began reading the board, it was clear they were excited about the week’s lesson.

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