Skip to main content

redwood fact

Cooley spruce gall. Photo by Joanne and Doug Schwartz

Exploring One of Nature’s Weird Phenomena

on

As you may have read in their recent blog, Doug and Joanne Schwartz – League members and dedicated volunteers – are serving this summer as our Redwood Explorers-in-Residence, exploring the northern parks, and ground-truthing and mapping the groves of ancient Continued

Long-horned beetle drawing by Loren Green, image courtesy of NPS

The Secret of the Long-Horned Beetle

on

We have probably all seen squirrels running around with a seed in tow, looking for  the perfect place to bury their food for the winter. Some of these seeds do get eaten later, and some are forgotten and eventually grow Continued

Redwood burl. Photo by Peter Montesano

Exploring the Mysteries of Redwood Burls

on

We’ve all seen them—those enormous growths from the trunks or bases of redwood trees, sometimes covered in new sprouts, sometimes appearing to drip down the side of the tree like the molten remnants of a lost limb.  These strange formations Continued

California Giant Salamander. Photo by William Leonard

Do salamanders bark in the woods?

on

Every time I talk to a researcher who works in the redwood region, I learn something that makes my jaw drop. It happened again just a few days ago when I was speaking with Prof. David Wake of U.C. Berkeley. Continued

Coast redwoods on the UCI campus are not thriving.

Can redwoods thrive in Southern California climate?

on

Redwoods do fine in Southern California, right? Researchers at UC Irvine are not totally convinced. In the 1980’s a scientist by the name of Ernest Ball cloned coast redwood giants from Northern California and reared test-tube redwoods. Many of these Continued

Megan Ferreira and I stand next to one of Yellowstone's remarkable petrified redwoods.

The Oldest Redwood I’ve Ever Seen

on

I just returned from a New Year’s trip through Yellowstone National Park, where I hiked out to see one of the petrified redwoods still standing on the forest slopes of Wyoming. This ancient redwood has been through an amazing transformation—its Continued

Grove in Hendy Woods State Park.

Life on the Forest’s Edge

on

It takes a long time to get to Hendy Woods State Park from San Francisco. It takes a while to get there from pretty much anywhere, but it’s worth it.  Approaching the park through the Anderson Valley wine country, the Continued

Giant sequoia branches covered in snow. Photo by garden beth, Flickr Creative Commons

Why are Christmas trees pointy on top?

on

Why are Christmas trees shaped the way they are, pointy on top and wide at the bottom?  It’s because their growth is regulated by hormones.  One such hormone (called auxin) is produced at the growing tip of the treetop and Continued

The ancient tree known as “Treebeard” has often been used as a traveler camp, and though burned from the inside many times, it has survived with some portions left dead from the fires. Photo by Mark Andre, Environmental Services

Old-Growth Redwood Burns in Arcata

on

“Transient Camp Causes Fire in Old-Growth Redwood Tree,” reads the headline posted by the City of Arcata at www.arcataeye.com. The fire did not damage just any old redwood.  It burned (and is apparently still burning) in ‘Treebeard,’ a redwood estimated Continued

A researcher climbs a giant sequoia at Mountain Home Grove next to a burned giant sequoia that remains alive with two vigorous sprouts near its broken top. Photo credit: Bob Van Pelt

Burned out but not fading away

on

It’s fairly difficult for me to imagine living for 3,000 years. Yet giant sequoias live for millennia, standing tall in a single location as the years, decades, and centuries tick by. They are pounded by rain, snow, sweltering heat, lightening, Continued

Giant redwood crowns loom over a canopy of lesser trees (Picea sitchensis, Tsuga heterophylla) in JSRSP. Photo by Stephen Sillett

Cap-and-trade among the redwoods

on

This was a big month in California. While the election may be the first thing that comes to mind, we also witnessed the first auction of carbon credits to companies that emit more than 25,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide every Continued

Ants tending aphids on the underside of young leaves of Big Leaf Maple (Acer macrophyllum) in Del Norte County.

Feasting in the Redwood Forest

on

No doubt, we have all experienced the joy of showing up to a thoughtfully prepared Thanksgiving feast with family and friends.  Surrounded by overflowing dishes of food, it is nearly impossible to go to bed hungry following a Thanksgiving meal. Continued

Redwood tree cores.

Cross-section of a redwood tree?

on

Since I was a little girl, I’ve enjoyed standing next to the large cross-section of redwood trunk on display at the entrance of Muir Woods National Monument. It boggles my mind that this redwood started growing in the year 909 Continued

Banana slug.

Slug Truth is Stranger than Fiction

on

Did you know that the coast redwood forest is home to the largest slug in North America and the second largest slug worldwide*?  Yep, our very own banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus) grows up to 8 inches in length and can Continued

Ageratina adenophora

They call it “forest killer”

on

I just returned from a vacation in Nepal, a beautiful country boasting the tallest mountains in the world. For two weeks I trekked through the mountains, seeing stark snowscapes and yak-covered slopes in the northern high Himalayas and the lush Continued

Join our newsletter
Get the latest redwood updates in your inbox
   Please leave this field empty
Top