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Annual Report 2017

With her heart and body soaring, a child experiences the wonder of Lady Bird Johnson Grove in Redwood National Park. Save the Redwoods League shared the thrill of places like this with the next generation of conservationists, connecting 7,300 students to the redwood forest through our education programs and welcoming 35,000 visitors to redwood and other parks on Green Friday, the day after Thanksgiving.
With her heart and body soaring, a child experiences the wonder of Lady Bird Johnson Grove in Redwood National Park. Save the Redwoods League shared the thrill of places like this with the next generation of conservationists, connecting 7,300 students to the redwood forest through our education programs and welcoming 35,000 visitors to redwood and other parks on Green Friday, the day after Thanksgiving.
Dear Save the Redwoods League Friends,

While conservation at Save the Redwoods League is a science-based process, it is driven by the fundamental and emotional objective of leaving the world better than we found it. This goal requires that we protect what is left of one of our greatest natural legacies — the ancient redwoods. The objective also requires that we pass on to our grandchildren and their grandchildren a vibrant, resilient and naturally functioning redwood forest, regenerated from the roots of the forest we have lost.

We sum up the League’s mission in three words: protect, restore and connect. We must meet all three goals to establish a healthy, resilient old- growth redwood forest for the future in this era of climate change and increased demands on natural resources. We work to protect the ancient redwoods and the vibrant forest landscapes that sustain them; restore young redwood forests so they become the magnificent old-growth forests for future generations; and connect people to the peace and beauty of the California redwoods through world-class parks and protected areas.

Our efforts toward these ends are many, and we describe them in this report. Here are three highlights of the past year.

We reached agreements that permanently protect and connect people to our magnificent Stewarts Point property on the rugged and spectacular coast.

Now the property’s beautiful old-growth and second-growth redwood stands, grasslands and a stretch of river are protected, and an agreement arranges for construction of a public trail with gorgeous coastal views. We also worked to reunite an indigenous tribe with an important ancestral site.

In Redwood National and State Parks, we made great strides toward our vision of restoring this redwood heartland. Our careful planning and research this year will ultimately accelerate the restoration of healthy redwood forest ecosystems in this region.

In the second year of our day-after-Thanksgiving event to connect new visitors to the forest, 35,000 people used free passes to enjoy 116 state parks. California State Parks Foundation and California State Parks collaborated with us to offer this popular event.

As we prepare to celebrate the League’s Centennial in 2018, our volunteers, donors and staff can look back on our accomplishments of this past year with profound satisfaction. We have protected critical redwood forestland, established an extraordinary forest restoration program, connected thousands of young students and new visitors to the redwood parks, and designed a strategic plan to take us into our second century. We have sustained our legacy of leadership in the conservation community and stand ready to extend that legacy in an era when it is needed more than ever.

Thank you for your generous support and contributions. We have made tremendous progress in the past year. We anticipate even greater successes ahead.


Justin Faggioli
Chair of the Board

Sam Hodder
President and CEO

 


The Impact of Your Support

Save the Redwoods League made great progress toward our mission of protecting and restoring the redwood forest and connecting people to its peace and beauty. From the coast redwood parks of Big Sur to the rainforest of Redwood National and State Parks near the Oregon border, from the restoration of Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias in Yosemite National Park to our inaugural brochure featuring 93 redwood parks in California, this year included a broad and deep portfolio of conservation successes.

See a summary and a map. See League financial reports.

 

Safeguarding ancient redwoods and the vibrant forest landscapes that sustain them

Our magnificent 870-acre Stewarts Point property is now permanently protected from subdivision and extensive logging and will welcome the public to a breathtaking coastal trail. We also successfully concluded a fundraising campaign and purchased the scenic, 77-acre Westfall Ranch to buffer the neighboring and iconic Headwaters Forest Reserve.

Learn more about these projects and others.

 

Setting young redwood forests on a trajectory to become the old-growth wonderlands for future generations

Together with our public agency partners, we set in motion Redwood Rising, a new initiative to increase the pace and scale of restoration that will put the young forests of Redwood National and State Parks back on the path to old-growth form and function. On three other properties, we reduced accumulations of highly combustible vegetation to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. And we led the planning for the first forest restoration project at San Vicente Redwoods.

Learn more about these projects.

 

Linking people to the peace and beauty of the California redwoods through a network of world-class parks and protected areas

Our Green Friday event, education programs, a new trail, inaugural Discover California Redwood Parks brochure and new children’s booklets connected tens of thousands of people with the wonder of the redwood forest and helped build a dedicated, long-term constituency for the conservation of these special places.

Learn more about these projects and others.

 

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